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Algebra/Mains Electricity by Country.

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QUESTION: Dear Prof Richard

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity_by_country‎
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity

Some Countries supply the Alternating current (AC) Electric Power supply with Input Voltage rating as 230 V, 50 Hz and some Countries supply Alternating current (AC) Electric Power supply with Input Voltage rating as 110 V, 60 Hz.

So similarly various Electrical appliances and devices viz Microwave Ovens, Geysers, Electric Iron, freeze, Television set, Fans etc are designed to work with this Input Electric power.

Do you feel people residing in those countries which supply the 110 V, 60 Hz Input Power supply will have electricity Meter rating i.e. Electricity Bill less (i.e. Power consumption - Watts) as compared to those people residing in countries which supply the 230 V, 50 Hz Input Power supply ?.

Electricity Bill - Meter reading will be less for consumers staying in those countries which supply 110 V, 60 Hz than for those consumers staying in those countries which supply 230 V, 50 Hz electric supply ?.

Does the Input Electric Power variant will make a difference in Output power consumption and subsequently in Electricity Meter reading ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

ANSWER: First of all, 60Hz vs. 50Hz makes no difference.  The U.S. has chosen to use mostly 110v for most uses, lights, TV, radio, etc.  This is partly because people are less likely to be hurt if they make contact with a 110v line than a 220v line and wiring for 110v applications is cheaper than wiring for 220v.  We use 220v for stoves, heating and cooling.  The energy usage is the same, since E = IV.  So if you double the voltage and halve the current, you get the same thing.  

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Dear Prof Richard

Thank you.

Do you still feel for the same model in different countries with different input voltages of 230 V AC, 50 Hz and 110 V AC, 60 Hz for the electrical equipment used, will the electronic meter bill (Units consumed) for 110 V AC will be less as compared to 230 V AC, 50 Hz ?.

There are pros and cons of using 230 V AC, 50 Hz v/s 110 V AC, 60 Hz
adopted as the Power supply standards by different countries ?.

Isn't it ?.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

ANSWER: As I mentioned before, it makes no difference to have 110 volts at 15 amps or 220 volts at
7.5 amps.  I have a greenhouse that I heat with a 4Kw 220v electric heater.  That's run on one circuit from my breaker box.  It would take three circuits of 110 volts to provide the same amount of heat.  

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Dear Prof Richard

Thank you.

One Last Question.

Do you feel those countries which supply the 230 V , 50 Hz Input Power Supply through Power transmitting stations (MW) i.e Power Plants overall results in more cost factor for production (Generators equipment) and maintenance than those Power plants which generate 110 V, 60 Hz for distributing electricity to factories, Household etc.

i.e. To Summarize my query, Do those Power plants (where countries use
230 V AC, 50 Hz) can result in Overall more cost factor for running the Plant than those Power Plants (where countries use 110 V AC, 60 Hz) ?.

i.e. Production and maintenance cost for Power Pants increases in those countries (230 V Ac, 50 Hz) than countries (110 V AC, 60 Hz) or it should not ideally make any difference ?.


Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Answer
No power plant that I'm aware of generates electricity at 110 volts or even 220 volts.  They do it at 440 volts.  It's stepped up to several hundred thousand volts to transmit the energy many miles.  Then it's stepped down and enters our homes at 220 volts.  

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