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Algebra/Can the following be turned into an algebraic equation?

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Question
If a car with a two litre engine travels up a fifteen degree hill at ten miles an hour, how much fuel will it use if the hill is one hundred metres high?

Answer
The equation would give results that were close.
To make it a fairly simple case, three needs to be 3 constants.

The 1st is for the amount of gas used to keep the engine going.
That is where the constant in the equation comes from.

The 2nd is the amount of gas used at each speed.  The multiplier would be how fast the car was going.  If it was using 1 unit of gas to maintain 10 mph for one hour, then it would be using 2 units of gas to maintain 20 mph, 3 units of gas to maintain 30 mph, 4 to maintain 40 mph, etc.

The 3rd is the slope of the road.  If the slope of the road were 0%, there would be none.  For each percent, some constant should be added.  The maximum slope allowed on the interstates is 6%.  It can actually spend a time at 7% if the freeway is in a really hilly region.  Due to the fact that the slope is kept to such a small percentage, a linear approximation to the affect on mileage can be used.

There perhaps could be another for how fast the acceleration is done, but since most cars are run at a fairly constant rate most of the time, I won't worry about that one.

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Scott A Wilson

Expertise

Any algebraic question you've got. That includes question that are linear, quadratic, exponential, etc.

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I have solved story problems, linear equations, parabolic equations. I have also solved some 3rd order equations and equations with multiple variables.

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Documents at Boeing in assistance on the manufacturiing floor.

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MS at math OSU in mathematics at OSU, 1986. BS at OSU in mathematical sciences (math, statistics, computer science), 1984.

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Both my BS and MS degrees were given with honors.

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Students in a wide variety of areas since the 80's; over 1,000 of them have been in algebra.

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