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Alzheimer`s Disease/Alzheimer's and urinating

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Question
My husband was diagnosed with AD 5 years ago and has just recently started urinating in strange places; next to the bed, in the closet etc.  I'm sure that it must be occurring during the night as he does use the the bathroom during the day.  I have him use the toilet before going to bed and there are night lights in both his bedroom and the bathroom, which is right next to the bedroom.  I am lost and could use any suggestions you offer.  I have considered diapers, but don't think that's the answer.

Thank you for any assistance.

Answer
Hello Lorraine:  I know this is extremely frustrating for you, and I'm sorry to hear you are dealing with it.  It's a difficult thing to handle since he's still so "mobile" and able to toilet himself.  He's just not recognizing what/where the toilet is with the brain damage.  A couple of things you can consider:
(1)  Purchase an alarm pad that will be set off once he gets out of bed and you can then assist him to the bathroom;
(2)  Get a bedside commode and have it right beside his bed--there is no guarantee he will use it, but it may decrease the accidents. Be sure it place it where he will be standing up, and have the lid up so he sees what it is.   
I think you're right in that briefs would not help in his case--he would just pull them down.  
Know that this problem will not last forever.  The brain damage will increase, and he will eventually become incontinent and will not awaken to urinate.  Until that happens, I wish you much luck in decreasing this problem Lorraine.  Cindy

Alzheimer`s Disease

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Cindy Keith, RN, BS, Certified Dementia Practitioner

Expertise

As a nurse and dementia consultant, I can answer most questions on all types of dementia. If I cannot answer your question, I will attempt to find someone who can. My passion is to help caregivers of people with dementia, which in turn helps all those wonderful elders with dementia live better lives. When caregivers are better educated, they are able to better care for themselves and their loved ones, so education is key to decreased stress levels and healthier, happier families.

Experience

I have worked as a nurse in various disciplines of nursing for over 20 years, most of which was with the elderly. I was a health care coordinator in a dementia dedicated assisted living facility for 4 years before I started my own business (M.I.N.D. in Memory Care) as a dementia consultant six years ago. As a dementia consultant, I help families nationwide through phone conference calls as they struggle to care for their loved ones with dementia.

Organizations
Alzheimer's Foundation of America Geriatric Interest Network Sigma Theta Tau International

Publications
Published "Love, Laughter, & Mayhem - Caregiver Survival Manual For Living With A Person With Dementia" which is a collection of stories about people with dementia I have known, loved and worked with. Every story has a lesson to teach and this book gently teaches family caregivers lessons about how to better care for their loved one, as well as themselves during their caregiving journey. Published "Love, Laughter, & Mayhem In Eldercare Facilities: The Master Key For Dementia Training" Created "Bringing Nurturing To Memory Care" staff dementia training video Created Ebook: "Hair Stylist's Helpful Tips For Working With People With Alzheimer's & Other Dementias"

Education/Credentials
Registered Nurse with Bachelor's degree in Nursing; Certified Dementia Practitioner; Author of 2 books and an ebook

Awards and Honors
Sigma Theta Tau National Honor Society of Nursing

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