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Hi Maria,
I have two questions:

Can you tell me the ancient Greek equivalent to the Latin term of endearment Carissima/Carissime (or something similar) that would have been used between a husband and wife or mother and child?

Also, I'm confused about how to say, "Be quiet!" in Latin. (specifically for a man addressing another man, and for a man addressing a group of men and women).  Is it taceo? quieto(s)?

Thanks for your help!

Answer
Hello,

I’m sorry, but I have to tell you  that AllExperts policy states that each category has its specific matter and then in this category you should have asked only questions relating to Ancient History, not to Latin & Greek language whose  category is “Ancient Languages” at the following link: http://www.allexperts.com/ep/2210-23221/Ancient-Languages/Maria.htm .

Anyway, this time I’ll answer your question, instead of rejecting it.

So, "Be quiet!" translates as “Tace!”  in Latin, if a man or anybody is addressing another man/woman/boy/girl, and so uses the 2nd.person singular of the present imperative of the verb TACEO (="I am quiet/silent", because TACEO is the 1st.person singular of the present indicative)).

If on the contrary  a man or anybody is addressing a group of men or men  and women, in short is addressing more than only one person, the imperative “Be quiet!“ translates as “Tacete!” in the 2nd.person plural.

Unlike English, in fact, Latin has different endings according to a 2nd person singular or a 2nd person plural, whereas in English “Be quiet”  is an imperative which refers either to only one person  (2nd person singular) or more than only one person (2nd person plural).


As for the ancient Greek equivalent to the Latin term of endearment “Carissima” (vocative feminine singular) or  “Carissime “ (vocative masculine singular) that can be used between a husband and wife or mother and child, it would be as follows:

-ὦ φίλτατε (superlative of the adjective  φίλος, masculine singular, vocative case) transliterated as “ô fíltate”

or:

-ὦ φιλτάτη (superlative, feminine singular, vocative case) transliterated as “ô filtátê”.

Note that the word ὦ transliterated as ô is an exclamation/interjection as in "O Lord!"
  
Hope this can be helpful to you.

Best regards,

Maria

Ancient/Classical History

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Maria

Expertise

My field of expertise is Ancient Greek and Roman History.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D.in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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