Ancient Languages/Latin translation

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Question
Hi there,

I was wondering if you could translate the phrase:
"Love life, regret nothing" into latin?

Thanks so much

Answer
Hello,

the phrase “Love life, regret nothing” can be translated as follows, according to the meaning of the verb  “to regret”:

-“Vitam ama,  nihil desidera!” as well as  “Vitam ama, noli quicquam desiderare! “, if the imperative “Regret ” is used in the sense that you don’t  feel regret for anything, such as e.g. a lost opportunity, as the Latin verb “desiderare” is used with predominant idea of lacking/wanting/ missing something



-“Vitam ama, nihil te paeniteat !”, if the imperative “Regret” is used in the sense that you have nothing to repent of, such as e.g. a deplorable action/ behaviour.

So, you must choose the translation that is more appropriate for your purpose.

Read more below.

Best regards,
Maria
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Note that:

-Love = AMA (2nd.person singular, imperative of AMO, I love)

-life =VITAM (direct object, accusative of VITA, 1st.declension)

-Regret = DESIDERA (2nd.person singular, imperative of DESIDERO, I regret) or NOLI.....DESIDERARE (negative imperative, 2nd.person singular) or finally TE PAENITEAT (hortatory subjunctive of  the impersonal verb “Paenitet”)

-nothing = NIHIL ((accusative neuter singular) or QUICQUAM (accusative neuter singular of the pronoun QUISQUAM equivalent to "anyone/anything" in a negative phrase).

As you can see, Latin word order can be different from English.

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin & Ancient Greek Language and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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