Ancient Languages/Please translate!

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Question
My boss has given me the phrase 'Delegatus delegare non potest' - what does it mean and where does it come from please?

Answer
Hello,

the Latin sentence “Delegatus delegare non potest” literally  means:”A delegate cannot delegate”,that is to say:”A delegate or deputy cannot appoint another”, i.e.“The one  to whom power is delegated cannot himself further delegate that power”.

Such a Latin phrase  is  a principle which is present in several  constitutional and administrative laws and jurisdictions.

[Read more below].

Best regards,
Maria
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Note that:

-DELEGATUS  (past participle, passive, nominative masculine, 2nd.declension) = a delegate/the one who has been delegated

-DELEGARE (infinitive of the verb DELEGO, I delegate) = delegate

-NON(negative ) = not

-POTEST (3rd.person singular, present indicative of the verb POSSUM, I can) =can. In short, NON POTEST corresponds to “cannot”.

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin & Ancient Greek Language and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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