Ancient Languages/Latin translation

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Question
Good day

Would you please be so kind and translate this phrase for me:

Res quce erat temporaria necessitatis et liberi arbitrii, non debet in exemplum trahi, multo minus ut necessaria obtrudi.

Thank you in advance

Chris

Answer
Hello,

"Res quae erat temporaria, necessitatis et liberi arbitrii non debet in exemplum trahi, multo minus ut necessaria obtrudi” literally means:”What was temporary, must not be taken as an example of  necessity and free will, nor must be imposed as absolutely necessary”, that is to say:"This example cannot be a copy for after-times, to follow as a command, or to imitate as a perfection".


Such a Latin sentence is one of the  expository notes, with practical observations, on the Acts 4:32 and Acts 2:44 by William Burkitt, a biblical expositor and vicar in Dedham, Essex, UK, died in 1703.
[See William Burkitt, Expository Notes with Practical Observations on the New Testament (Gospels published 1700, Acts to Revelation published 1703]


In these Biblical passages we read that:” All the believers were one in heart and mind. No one claimed that any of their possessions was their own, but they shared everything they had”( Acts 4:32) and : “All the believers were together and had everything in common. They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need” (Acts 2:44-45).

So, in his  note that W.Burkitt wrote in Latin which was the language of the learned persons at that time he says what I've just translated, i.e.:”Res quae erat temporaria, necessitatis et liberi arbitrii non debet in exemplum trahi, multo minus ut necessaria obtrudi” literally meaning:”What was temporary, must not be taken as an example of  necessity and free will, nor must be imposed as absolutely necessary”.

In short, William Burkitt wanted  to point out that all the believers had to contribute to the necessities of each other, so that they had to call nothing their own, but had to help and relieve the poor. Notwithstanding, "this example cannot be a copy for after-times, to follow as a command, or to imitate as a perfection".

Best regards,
Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin & Ancient Greek Language and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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