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Dear Maria,

I was trying to find the original Greek text for Aristotle's "Rhetoric" with an English translation, but I can't find a good website online.  Every site I find gives only the ancient Greek or only the English translation.  My friend is studying Greek and I wanted to leave him the message "wit is well-bred insolence" in it's original Greek form.  I wanted to look up this quote and others online, but I can't seem to find any website that will give me a (figurative) side-by-side text of the original Greek and it's English translation.

Would you be able to direct me to a website that will allow me to look up the original Greek text for the more famous ancient Greek quotes?  Google only gives the quotes themselves in their English form and I'm not finding what I want with the searches I've conducted.

I appreciate any help you can offer.

Yours truly,

Alex D.

Answer
Hello,

Here’s the original Greek text for Aristotle's "Rhetoric", Book 2, Chapter 12, section 16 (aka 1389 b) with an English translation:

Ἡ γὰρ εὐτραπελία πεπαιδευμένη ὕβρις ἐστίν  
(“Wit is well-bred insolence” or “Wit is cultured insolence” ).

Please note that such a sentence is a part of a longer phrase which reads as follows:

Kαὶ φιλογέλωτες, διὸ καὶ φιλευτράπελοι: ἡ γὰρ εὐτραπελία πεπαιδευμένη ὕβρις ἐστίν. τὸ μὲν οὖν τῶν νέων τοιοῦτόν ἐστιν ἦθος
(”And they are fond of laughter, and therefore witty; for wit is cultured /well-bred insolence. Such then is the character of the young”).
[See Aristotle, Rethoric, Book 2, Chapter 12, section 16 (aka 1389 b)  and  Book 2,  Chapter 13, section 1 (aka 1389 b)].   

Read more below.

As for your question about a website that can give you a side-by-side text of the original Greek and its English translation, I'm afraid that such a  website does not exist, whereas there are some websites that can allow you to look up the original Greek text for the more famous ancient Greek quotes, on the condition that you know  what work the quote comes  from: which however is almost always not said, since  Google only gives the quotes themselves in their English form without saying their original source.


Best regards,

Maria
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Note that in Ἡ γὰρ εὐτραπελία πεπαιδευμένη ὕβρις ἐστίν  :

-Ἡ γὰρ εὐτραπελία (subject in the nominative case, 1st declension) = Wit

-πεπαιδευμένη (perfect participle, middle-passive voice, nominative feminine agreeing with the feminine noun Ἡ εὐτραπελία) = well-bred /cultured

-ὕβρις (nominative case, 3rd declension) = insolence

-ἐστίν  (3rd person singular, present indicative of the verb εἰμί, I am) = is

As you can see, ancient Greek word order is different from English, for ancient Greek is an inflected language where grammatical relationships are indicated by the ending of the words, not by their order.

For καὶ φιλογέλωτες, διὸ καὶ φιλευτράπελοι: ἡ γὰρ εὐτραπελία πεπαιδευμένη ὕβρις ἐστίν  and τὸ μὲν οὖν τῶν νέων τοιοῦτόν ἐστιν ἦθος  see the following links:

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0059%3Aboo

http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.01.0059%3Aboo  (at the beginning).

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin & Ancient Greek Language and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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