Ancient Languages/Narenus

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Question
Hello Maria,

I'm under the impression that the Latin word, "Nazarenus" equally well translates into "the Nazarene" as well as its traditionally understood translation of "of Nazareth."

Can you confirm or correct?

Thank you,
Paul

Answer
Hello,

It is so: the Latin adjective “Nazarenus” translates into “the Nazarene” as well as “of Nazareth”, simply because “Nazarenus” derives from the Latin name “Nazăra” / “Nazăreth” that was the name of the city of Galilee where Jesus grew up.
Hence the Latin appellation “Iesus Nazarenus”(Jesus of Nazareth)that we find in the letters “INRI”, i.e. the initials for the Latin title that Pontius Pilate had written over the head of Jesus Christ on the cross (John 19:19).

The words of INRI were in fact “Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum” or “Iesvs Nazarenvs Rex Ivdaeorvm” (with the V  instead of U), both meaning “Jesus of Nazareth, the King of the Jews"

Have a nice day,

Maria

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Maria

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I am an expert in Latin & Ancient Greek Language and I'll be glad to answer any questions concerning this matter.

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Over 25 years teaching experience.

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I received my Ph.D. in Classics (summa cum laude) from Genova University (Italy).

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