Ancient Languages/Translation

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QUESTION: Is it possible to covert this sentence for me please?

"What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others."

I'm looking for quotes to be placed into an order of service for the passing of my father. And had the idea of a few Latin inspirational quotes throughout or something similar that suggest celebrating life.  I hope this is not too vague.

Thanks

ANSWER: Hello,

First of all I’d like to thank you for clarifying your thought and purpose, so that now I can give you a Latin translation of this sentence which is nothing but an English adaptation of a passage we read in Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, book II, chapter 43, section 3, where the great historian Thucydides quotes the words that would have been uttered by Pericles for the Athenian soldiers who had died at one of the opening battles of the Peloponnesian War (See below).

That being stated, here’s a Latin translation of “What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others":

-“Memoria tui  elogium tumulo insculptum solum non est, sed etiam recordatio ea quae semper in omnium haerebit mentibus”.  
[literally, “The memory of you is not only an inscription engraved on a tombstone, but also that remembrance which  will always  remain in the hearts and minds of all”].

Please note that a literal rendering of the English “What you leave behind is not what is engraved in stone monuments, but what is woven into the lives of others” would have sounded not so good in Latin, as each language has its peculiarities.


Hope this is clear enough. Feel free however to ask me again.

Please accept my condolences upon the death of your father.

Sincerely,

Maria
______________________________________________________________________________________
P.S.
Thucydides, The Peloponnesian War, book II, chapter 43, section 3:
“The sepulchre of famous men is the whole earth, not only the epigraph engraved on the columns in their own country, since also in foreign lands there dwells the unwritten memorial of them, graven not on stone but in the hearts and minds of men.”( Greek, ἀνδρῶν γὰρ ἐπιφανῶν πᾶσα γῆ τάφος, καὶ οὐ στηλῶν μόνον ἐν τῇ οἰκείᾳ σημαίνει ἐπιγραφή, ἀλλὰ καὶ ἐν τῇ μὴ προσηκούσῃ ἄγραφος μνήμη παρ᾽ ἑκάστῳ τῆς γνώμης μᾶλλον ἢ τοῦ ἔργου ἐνδιαιτᾶται).
See also my answer at http://en.allexperts.com/q/Greek-2004/2009/3/Pericles-1.htm


Also note that in “Memoria tui elogium tumulo insculptum solum non est, sed  etiam  recordatio ea quae semper in omnium haerebit mentibus”:

-MEMORIA (nominative, 1st declension) = the memory
-TUI (genitive of the 2nd person pronoun) = of you
-ELOGIUM (nominative, neuter noun , 2nd declension)= an/the inscription
-TUMULO (dative singular of TUMULUS, 2nd declension) =on a tombstone
-INSCULPTUM (past participle neuter of INSCULPERE agreeing with ELOGIUM) = engraved
-SOLUM =only
-NON = not
-EST (3rd person singular, present indicative of “sum”) =is
-SED ETIAM = but also
-RECORDATIO (nominative, 3rd declension) = memory/remembrance
-EA (nominative feminine of the adjective IS agreeing with RECORDATIO) = that
-QUAE (nominative feminine, relative pronoun)= which
-SEMPER =always
-IN (preposition which takes the ablative MENTIBUS)= in
-OMNIUM (genitive plural of OMNIS) = of all
-HAEREBIT (future of HAEREO)= will remain
-MENTIBUS (ablative plural of MENS, 3rd declension)= minds/hearts and minds

As you can see, Latin word order can be different from English for Latin is an inflected language where grammatical relationships are indicated by the ending, not by the order of the words.


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: would the word order read better as :

Memoria tui non solum elogium est tumulo insculptum, ...?


Is Tumulo more specifically a burial mound?

Does mentibus just mean "minds", not "hearts and minds".?


Thanks for your help

Answer
1)Apart from the fact that  in Latin the word order depends on the choice of the speaker/writer, I think that “Memoria tui non solum elogium est tumulo insculptum..” is not better than  “Memoria tui  elogium tumulo insculptum solum non est…”.
Anyway, you can use the one you like better.

2)the masculine noun “tumulus”(nominative singular)  means either “burial mound” or “grave/ tomb/ tombstone/ sepulchral monument"

3)The feminine noun “mens” (ablative, “mentibus”)  means  either "mind" and  "heart and mind" as a a harmonious whole.

To conclude, you can say :“Memoria tui  elogium tumulo insculptum solum non est, sed etiam recordatio ea quae semper in omnium haerebit mentibus” as well as “Memoria tui non solum elogium est tumulo insculptum, sed etiam recordatio ea quae semper in omnium haerebit mentibus” or finally “Memoria tui non solum est elogium tumulo insculptum, sed etiam recordatio ea quae semper in omnium haerebit mentibus”.

I leave the choice up to you.

Best regards,

Maria

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