You are here:

Anesthesiology/General Anasthetic administered twice within 4 months

Advertisement


jgtwen wrote at 2015-02-21 18:44:21
It is not as clear cut as stated above. There is ongoing research into the question as stated in this draft version of a panel of experts on Pediatric Anesthesia:



"CONSENSUS STATEMENT ON THE USE OF ANESTHETIC AND SEDATIVE DRUGS IN INFANTS, TODDLERS, AND PRESCHOOL CHILDREN

(Draft 2014 Revision)

Each year, millions of infants, toddlers, and preschool children require anesthesia and/or sedation for surgery and procedures. Animal studies demonstrate long-term, possibly permanent adverse effects of anesthetic and sedative drugs on the developing brain. These include adverse effects on behavior, learning, and memory. Observational studies in children suggest that similar deficits may occur. These studies in children had limitations that prevent experts from drawing conclusions on whether the harmful effects were due to the anesthesia or to other factors, including surgery, hospitalization, or pre-existing conditions, and from determining the ages at which children are vulnerable. We need to know if anesthetic and sedative drugs cause brain damage in infants, toddlers, and preschool children. Therefore funding for further research, including definitive clinical trials, is required.



Infants, toddlers, and preschool children may be more vulnerable to the adverse effects of anesthetic and sedative drugs. This emerging information from animal and human studies is concerning to healthcare providers and parents. Nevertheless, many surgeries and procedures in this age group are necessary and may require the use of anesthetics and sedatives. Until further research clarifies the significance of these findings we recommend:



Parents and caregivers should discuss the risks, benefits, and timing of surgery and procedures requiring anesthetics and sedative drugs. Surgeries and procedures requiring anesthetic and sedative drugs that could reasonably be delayed should possibly be postponed because of the potential risk to the developing brain of infants, toddlers, and preschool children.



When surgeries and procedures are required using current standard of care anesthetics, consider participating in a study to help identify better anesthetic and sedative practices and/or drugs that have the least effect on the developing brain.



From:

http://www.smarttots.org/resources/consensus.html



See also:

http://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/video/drugs.cfm?yid=t_ajURa-W7Q




Anesthesiology

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


JM Starkman, MD

Experience

Over twenty-five years of adult and pediatric, inpatient and outpatient clinical anesthesia practice--some private, some group.

Organizations
American Association of Physicians and Surgeons. My county medical society.

Publications
[not a researcher]

Education/Credentials
American medical school graduate. Board Certified. Fellowship trained Cardiovascular and Pediatric anesthesia subspecialist.

Past/Present Clients
Over 20,000 anesthetics, the majority of which have been personally managed, with less than 5% consisting of supervising nurse anesthetists or in-training resident physicians.

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.