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Antique Clocks/McClintock electric alarm clock

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Question
I ordered a new alarm clock online.  It arrived and of course it was made in China.  It is lopsided.  The # 12 is skewed to the left of vertical.  The face is also not vertical but tips forward.  Since new things are mostly junk these days (what a shame to waste resources producing junk), I decided to get a vintage clock.  I found one on Ebay that I LOVE.  It is classic Art Deco style made of Bakelite and brass.  It is electric, but unfortunately doesn't work.  Do you know where I would be able to get this clock repaired?  It is O.B. McClintock, Model 15 D700, patent 1942.  I'm including a link to the clock, but don't know if it will work here.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vintage-Art-Deco-Electric-McClintock-Alarm-Clock-1940s-/

Really don't want to buy it unless I can be sure it can be repaired.  
Thanks so much, Cindy

Answer
Electric clocks generally do not show much wear and run until the lubricating oil stiffens and becomes varnish. This varnish can generally be removed with carburetor cleaner or one of the cleaning materials available from organizations such as Merritts (www.merritts.com) and Timesavers (www.timesavers.com). I am not sure about the exact details of the McClintock brand movement. If it is a slow speed movement, all the pivot points would be accessible and the gears can be pushed to cause the rotor to spin working the solvent into the pivots. After cleaning the movement should be given several hours to dry and lubricated with a household oil such as sewing machine oil. If it is a sealed movement, I generally drill or file a hole so I can squirt carb cleaner into the gear case. It is not generally a good idea to force these movements to spin on their own so I generally take the movement outside away from combustible materials and plug it in to an extension cord. Sometimes you have to shake it and slosh the solvent around but I have always been able to get them to run by doing this. The movement is then drained of solvent after it has run for a while. It may be necessary to chill the movement in the refrigerator, then set it in the sun so the solvent will be extracted as it will eventually evaporate and result in lack of lubrication. Oil is then sprayed in, I prefer automatic transmission fluid for this as these sealed movements generally run fairly warm and these fluids have plenty of antioxidants. When using carb cleaner, be sure the area is well ventilated an no source of ignition is present, as this material is flammable.

It would be a good idea to check the electrical resistance between the two prongs of the plug. It should be something less than 100,000 ohms and certainly more than 500. An open coil would make it difficult to repair as a new coil would have to be wound. Again, electric clocks are quite easily repaired by cleaning and lubricating as I have several in my collection I purchased not running which I was able to get running.

I am not sure whether all clock makers like to work on electrics but almost anyone in that business would have the tools to do this. The sealed movements present their challenges.
There was a time replacement movements were available, but with everything going to China these days this is no longer the case. Certain movements are available from the above mentioned websites but some improvising may be necessary to mount up a replacement.

I hope this information proves helpful and good luck with your clock. I viewed it on ebay and it is a nice looking clock.  

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Tom Williams

Expertise

I can not think of any questions I cannot answer in regard to repairing antique clocks or radios. However, I am sure there are a few I have not heard and may not be able to answer. If I cannot, I will say so. I have been repairing them since I was a young child.

Experience

My experience includes repairing CooKoo clocks, Westminsters, BimBam, almost all antique clocks. I do a bit of repair on battery clocks where the value is sufficient to warrant working on them. I also repair antique (tube type) radios - all makes.

Organizations
Indiana Historical Radio Society, Illinois Valley Antique Car Club, Military Vehicle Preservation Association

Education/Credentials
BEE from Cleveland State University

Awards and Honors
Four patents.

Past/Present Clients
Friends and family

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