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Mid century chair
Mid century chair  

Closeup of springs in seat
Closeup of springs in  
I picked up this chair frame for a few dollars, but it needs a lot of work. It's partially sanded and looks like the springs need some work, and new cushions.
I'm curious to know if I'm better off stripping the old stain or sanding? Also, I find it strange a chair like this has sinuous springs. There's evidence that the old webbing was cut from the seat and the springs look rather new. Do I need the springs? Can I just use webbing?

Answer
stain does not strip off.  stain gets into the wood.  even stain that is mixed in with clear coatings and sprayed on with the clear will get into the wood.

first, i would not have sanded, i would have used paint remover to remove any clear coating.  Now that sanding has been like this you need to continue till you have new wood.  

these springs are called no sag springs and they could have been added later.  Probably were.  Originally there might have been tight webbing with a cushion sitting on the webbing.  That is what I generally see on these style chairs.

do the webbing then make a cushion about 3-4 inches high.

are you going to restain?  

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robert klein

Expertise

Regarding American antique, vintage, and collectible furniture I can help with wood identification, styles, age, periods, historical coatings, materials, techniques, repair, restoration, refinishing. Please read instructions for posting.

Experience

I have been in the antiques furniture and restoration business and in the sales of American antique furniture for 40+ years and have continued my education in the trade attending workshops and seminars through several organizations.

Organizations
Professional Refinishers Groop, Int., AIC, Antiques Dealers Association

Education/Credentials
BA Florida State University BA University of West Florida 1971

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They deserve privacy, sorry.

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