Art History/talio-chrome

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Elise wrote at 2007-03-22 22:17:05
We recently purchased a framed print of "Point Mugu" by Lionel Barrymore. On the frame backing, there are two cards: one of which is a Christmas greeting from the Hart and Burns Co. of Riverside, CA., and the other that gives a brief history of Barrymore's artistic endeavors. Included in the explanation: "Mr. Barrymore consented to have them (his limited works)reproduced in Talio-Chrome."  The paper is either very yellowed, or originally gold, and the sketch is black. Hope this helps!  


Ellen At Howards wrote at 2007-08-16 20:39:54
We are a custom frame shop with one of the Talio-Chromes in to be reframed. The artist is not a Fairbanks, but Lionel Barrymore. It is some sort of dot printing method (under magnification). It is an impressive name, though...


dennis2j wrote at 2011-01-13 21:54:21
The posted answer is close to being correct, and perhaps I can nudge it a little closer.  Talio-chrome is a gravure printing process, gravure being an intaglio printing method, hence the name:  talio/taglio (the "g" is silent)  I can't be positive about the chrome part, but I do know that modern gravure image carriers are often chrome-plated in order to increase their lifespan and increase the number of usable reproductions.  The actor referred to in the above response should probably be "Lionel Barrymore", not "Fairbanks".  Reproductions of some of his art were made after his death using the Talio-Chrome method. My guess is that his estate authorized the production of prints of his art, and that the Talio-Chrome process was selected to make lots and lots of them.  There are many of these still around and available on eBay today.  


TSArt wrote at 2011-06-12 23:41:22
I have in my possession a Talio Crome print of Lionel Barrymore's etching entitled, "Quiet Waters". (So, no, the artist is NOT Douglas Fairbanks, as the previous answerer speculated).

I can't find any good information about this process of reproducing etchings, either.


TSArt wrote at 2011-06-12 23:42:02
I have in my possession a Talio Crome print of Lionel Barrymore's etching entitled, "Quiet Waters". (So, no, the artist is NOT Douglas Fairbanks, as the previous answerer speculated).

I can't find any good information about this process of reproducing etchings, either.


Steven Garber wrote at 2011-09-16 14:49:08
There's a good chance R. H. Palenske also used this printmaking method. His art was mostly Western scenes of landscapes, wildlife, horses and cowboys. The print I have is of a chuck wagon and cowboys riding horses fast to get fed. It's entitled "Come and Get It." There's a plate impression on the paper. The ink used was dark. The lines aren't as dark, clear or crisp as from a metal etching. The lines are less distinct, more like from a lithographic technique. The kink used may have faded some, it is almost black. The paper is good quality and absorbent.  


Jackarthur wrote at 2015-10-13 05:20:36
I think talio chrome is the antiquary equivalent of the more modern method of steelfacing wherein a copper plate etching is faced with steel post production to ensure a longer printing life.  


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AliMcJ

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Working artist with academic arts background; knowledgeable also about Asian arts, especially Chinese. Undergraduate degree in Art Education, specialization in printmaking.

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American Cinematheque; Los Angeles Conservancy; National Trust for Historic Preservation; the Museum of Television and Radio, Beverly Hills; the Dallas Museum of Art

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M.A., CSULB, Fine Art (Painting, specialization in watercolor/life painting)
B.A., CSULB, Art Education, specialization in printmaking; minor in English

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