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Ask the Veterinarian/Is apple okay to give to a cat?


My cat likes to eat a few morcels of my apple when I am eating it.  Is it safe to give it to her?  Also, are there any "human" foods that I should't give her?  Thanks for you time.

Hello Karmie,

Cats can indeed have apples, as long as you remove the apple seeds.These seeds are poisonous and contains cyanide.If you are giving your cat apple, you should also peel it, or wash it very well. Although the pesticides used on apples are not harmful to humans, since cats are much smaller, they can potentially be harmful. Like all other foods, apples should be given to cats in moderation. Too much apple can cause an upset stomach.

While humans are omnivores, meaning we can survive on meat and vegetables, a cat is classified as an obligate carnivore, meaning it needs meat to survive (or at least thrive). So, it's true that cats, unlike humans, don't derive much nutrition from vegetables.
Many cats love cheese, and it's a good source of protein for them. And although some cats are able to eat it without any problem, you'll find that dairy products often make the list of dangerous foods for cats. That's because as many cats mature to adulthood, they become lactose intolerant. For these adult cats, any cheese, milk or other dairy will cause diarrhea.

If you're interested in feeding your cat dairy, give it a very small amount at first to see how its digestive system handles it. It might be able to safely handle small portions of cottage cheese, or even yogurt and sour cream. You can also try giving your cat low-lactose varieties of cheese and milk.

If you only feed dairy to your cat occasionally as a special treat, you'll be able to use it to get a  cat to take its medicine. Some  cat owners actually grind up pills for their feline and put the powder on cheese or butter to get them to ingest the medicine.
Most cats love fish, and it can provide some much needed nutrients for them. But you should be aware of some concerns with serving your cat too much fish. The high levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids in a heavy tuna diet will deplete a cat's supply of vitamin E. You should also be aware that carnivorous fish like tuna, salmon and swordfish are more likely to contain higher levels of mercury than cod, halibut and flounder.
Eggs are great for humans and cats because they're rich in protein.Cooked eggs, such as scrambled or hard-boiled, make an excellent and nutritious treat for a cat.But eggs can cause allergy.So watch for manifestations of an allergic reaction if you do feed your cat eggs.
Because cats are carnivores, animal meat is one of the safest human foods to give a cat, and Cooked poultry is probably the best choice.



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Dr S Bindu Anand


Large and Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Farm Management,Preventive medicine


A Senior Veterinary Surgeon with more than 25 years’ experience in the field of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry. Mixed animal Practice that will utilize my skills in medicine and surgery, public health, client relations, and developing relationships within the community, such as humane society

Veterinary Consultant with Department of Animal Resources,Ministry of Environment,State of Qatar (Present). Animal Husbandry Department, Government of Kerala, India. Oakland's Park, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Severnside Veterinary Center, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Saud Bahwan Group, Sultanate of Oman. Trivandrum Regional Co-operative Milk Producers Union,Kerala,India.

BVSc & AH (Bachelor of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry) 1990. College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Mannuthy, Thrissur, Kerala, India under Kerala Agricultural University. Certificates Of Accomplishments- Equine Nutrition- University of Edinburgh Principles of Public Health-University of California, Irvine. AIDS- Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. General Environmental Health – EPHOC-Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. Food Protection-EPHOC-Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. Zoonoses:University of Minnesota-School of Public Health online. Food Safety:University of Minnesota-School of Public Health online. Occupational Safety and Health-EPHOC-Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. Rabies Educator Certified -Global Alliance for Rabies Control. Animal Handler & Vaccinator Educator Certified -Global Alliance for Rabies Control. Wildlife Conservation-United for Wildlife

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