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Question
Hi. My cat is a 12 year old male.
He had an operation two years ago. He had a blocked bladder. It was successful.
But today I was cleaning up his business and saw abit of blood in his stools. Can the blocked bladder come back. He had a blood test and the results came back normal. I have been feeding him dry biscuits and he doesn't drink much water.

Answer
Hi,

Male cats can easily develop obstruction of the urethra which is the tube draining urine from the bladder out of the penis.  Obstructions are often the result of plugs of inflammatory material, mucus, crystals,  small stones that have formed in the kidneys and have passed down into the bladder. The cause of the inflammatory materials and stone formation it not well understood, though viral infections and diet may play a role. Other causes are reported such as cancer, previous injury causing scarring, and trauma are also reported. Early neutering of cats does not cause reduction of urethral size as in some other species.
Re-obstruction is a concern.For cats that have 2 or 3 recurrences of obstruction, your veterinarian will recommend a surgical correction of the problem with a PU (perineal urethrostomy) surgery. This procedure can be likened to a “sex change” in your male cat, and it involves the surgical widening of the urethra to make it more the size of a female urethra.You didn't mention the kind of surgery done in your cat.Feeding dry foods can predispose for blockades.
Additional fluid is key to treating and preventing recurrence of the inflamed urinary bladder. This is best accomplished with a higher protein canned cat food, along with providing many sources of fresh water; ideally your cat will only eat canned food, and be completely off dry cat food. You can encourage fresh water consumption by adding tuna juice to the water bowl.
The use of a specific natural hormone can be very beneficial. Pheromones in the facial glands convey messages of peace and contentment. Cats have less incidence of urinary disease if they are feeling happy. A product called Feliway, available from your veterinarian, contains these facial pheromones. This can be sprayed on your cat and on the areas he has sprayed twice daily for 3-4 weeks.
Two very common supplements used for arthritis, glucosamine and chondroitin, can also be helpful for cats with feline lower urinary tract disease. Glucosamine helps replenish a compound found in the lining of the bladder wall, called glycosaminoglycans (GAG), while chondroitin helps protect the GAG from being broken down. By supplementing with glucosamine and chondroitin, GAG is replenished, and the bladder inflammation can be reduced.

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Dr S Bindu Anand

Expertise

Large and Small Animal Medicine and Surgery, Farm Management,Preventive medicine http://binduanand.webs.com/

Experience

A Senior Veterinary Surgeon with more than 25 years’ experience in the field of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry. Mixed animal Practice that will utilize my skills in medicine and surgery, public health, client relations, and developing relationships within the community, such as humane society

Organizations
Veterinary Consultant with Department of Animal Resources,Ministry of Environment,State of Qatar (Present). Animal Husbandry Department, Government of Kerala, India. Oakland's Park, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Severnside Veterinary Center, Gloucestershire, United Kingdom. Saud Bahwan Group, Sultanate of Oman. Trivandrum Regional Co-operative Milk Producers Union,Kerala,India.

Education/Credentials
BVSc & AH (Bachelor of Veterinary Science and Animal Husbandry) 1990. College of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Mannuthy, Thrissur, Kerala, India under Kerala Agricultural University. Certificates Of Accomplishments- Equine Nutrition- University of Edinburgh Principles of Public Health-University of California, Irvine. AIDS- Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia. General Environmental Health – EPHOC-Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. Food Protection-EPHOC-Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. Zoonoses:University of Minnesota-School of Public Health online. Food Safety:University of Minnesota-School of Public Health online. Occupational Safety and Health-EPHOC-Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Public Health. Rabies Educator Certified -Global Alliance for Rabies Control. Animal Handler & Vaccinator Educator Certified -Global Alliance for Rabies Control. Wildlife Conservation-United for Wildlife

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