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Bible Studies/Cont. of "the women and the empty tomb

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Hi Edward,
This is the last thing you said:

"The early tradition mentions the apparition to Peter; John puts Peter at the tomb as well as the Magdalene.
When and how does one recognize that a text is not intending to be factual when it reports something as factual?  I look for some clue -- for example, the location of the big sermon by Jesus in Mt and Lk  -- Since they do not agree on the place, one can wonder who has the better info. Is there a theological reason behind one of the locations?
What is in the women at the tomb [a very developed tradition in the four gospels] that suggests something other than a factual intention of a historical nucleus of women visiting the empty tomb on the first day of the week?  Note that this tradition does not mention the theological theme of the third day [day of revelation and good news/result throughout the bible].  Jewish reluctance concerning women as witnesses would not suggest that someone  would invent a visit by somewhat-unreliable witnesses.  Further, the presence of the body in a tomb would convince anyone of a resurrected Jesus, especially with the Jewish concept of a human being.  Also, how and why did the first day of the week become the traditional day for liturgy?
I hope these thoughts help, Hashem.  I welcome your reaction."

In terms of a clue for non-literal meaning, how about this "the women went to anoint a dead body." doesn't this sound a bit strange if takenn literally?
let's address the issue of the women first then we can deal with the other points you mention.
Regards,
Hashem

Answer
Given the fundamental and pivotal role of the resurrection of Jesus in the practice of Chritianity, one would expect that the customary burial customs would have been attempted for a devoted leader.
After the required Sabbath rest, which began shortly after the release of Jesus' body, one would expect someone[s] to perform the customary burial practices.  
Women are named in various ways --  indicating various strands of previous oral traditions.  I find no reason to find something other than the description of a real event.
Possibly, I have missed your reason for finding something "strange."
Again, best wishes.

P.S.: Would I have been near Al Balqa' when some years ago I visited Amman, Gerash, Petra?

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Edward Bode

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A scholar of Jewish and Christian scripture (biblical studies), I hold graduate degrees from three universities in Rome [Italy]: Pontifical Gregorian University, Pontifical Biblical Institute, and the University of St. Thomas. I also have a master's degree in English. My special interests are the gospels of the New Testament and the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

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I have taught at three universities and two colleges. My published works include one book, several articles in scholarly journals, and numerous book reviews.

I hold a doctorate in sacred theology from the University of St. Thomas in Rome, Italy; a license in sacred scripture from the Pontifical Biblical Institute in Rome; a license in sacred theology from the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome.Additionally, I earned a master's degree in English from the University of Missouri in Columbia, Mo., and a bachelor of journalism from the same university.

I have been a member of the Catholic Biblical Association of America for 40 years. I am a former member of Society of Biblical Literature.I have spoken on academic topics to local, national, and international groups.

Education/Credentials
I hold graduate degrees from three universities in Rome [Italy]: Pontifical Gregorian University, Pontifical Biblical Institute, and the University of St. Thomas. I also have a master's degree in English.

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