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Biology/Regarding evolution

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Question
Hi,

Thanks for your answer. I have another question after reading your answer. I was wondering why we didn't evolve to have more than 2 eyes. If we had more eyes like eyes to see behind, we would have known our surroundings better ensuring our survival. Can you please explain.

Answer
Hello again Ameen
 As I stated before "why" questions fit into the area of evolutionary biology. You must first understand that the evolutionary process is not really haphazard. Development of an organism cannot violate the laws of biology, physics and chemistry. For example the First Law tells that the amount of energy available is constant and nature abhors the waste of energy.
 Keeping that in mind lets look at your eye problem. Eyes are just sense organs. WE see and interpret what we see in the brain. Extra eyes or extra appendages involve more energy requirements. We also must consider that development of an organism involves symmetry. Most animals have a bilateral symmetry with a right and left side and a front and a back.. The development of a human embryo follows a pattern and a deviation will bring loss of the child. Development of the human species took a very long time and it is possible that many variations if human form were tried and rejected. Two eyes and a bilateral symmetry is what works best.
 Try to look at the whole picture. Sure. Extra eyes would help us see more. Extra arms could be an advantage but these things were rejected by the evolutionary process
 I hope I gave you some insight
walter

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Walter Hintz

Expertise

Science teacher for over 50 years. MSc. in biology. I can answer questions in general biology, zoology, botany, anatomy and physiology and biochemistry.

Experience

I have a MSc in biology and have been a science teacher for over 50 years. At present I am a faculty member at a college and a science consultant at seven catholic schools.

Publications
The Ohio journal of Science
Momentum-The Journal of the Catholic Education Association

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