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Bipolar Disorder/bipolar breakup, what to do

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Question
Hello! An answer to your question:

I really need to get an opinion on what to do.

My bipolar boyfriend broke up with me 5 weeks ago about about something completely silly, in this case, Facebook and why he ignored me. He refuses to see me or talk to me on the phone. We were together 23 months and he had already broken up up 3 times before this year and 2 times last year. We are in our 40s if that's of any relevance.

During the past breakups, he would ignore me for about a week or so and then would slowly start answering my texts and we would then always get back together after about 2 weeks.

This is the first time he really seems to mean it and I haven't stopped sobbing for the past 5 weeks. I really thought it would pass just like the other times, but unfortunately not. He seemed to be going into a depression just before the breakup but still seemed to want to see me. But then I can't be sure. He was diagnosed bipolar when he was an adolescent but does not take any medication.

We are still in contact (although he never initiates contact, it's always me), but sometimes he answers quickly, other times he ignores me for a couple of days. I am an absolute wreck because I really love this man, but I can't continue like this indefinitely, it's destroying my health and I fear losing my job with my constant crying at work.

Should I still continue contacting him or should I just give up and hope that he will come around eventually? Is there anything else I could do? He has never told me to stop contacting him, even though I've asked. He also never said he never wants to see me again, just not right away. I almost feel like he's enjoying seeing me so desperate and miserable. The constant contact as barely "friends" is really unbearable.

Thank you for your much-needed assistance.

Answer
Hi Gabriel,

You really need to reconsider your relationship with this man. He is Bipolar and will most likely continue to present unexpected mood swings. You have to make it part of the condition in your relationship to continue medical treatment, abide by the medication etc. If not, you are bound to be very unhappy, and then you have to ask yourself the question whether you are not more worth for a better relationship with somebody else.

It will help him to go on a hypoglycemic diet, because we have found that most Bipolar people have hypoglycemia that make things worse for them. But it should be understood the hypoglycemic diet alone is not going to cure him of Bipolar Disorder. He needs to be under the supervision of  doctor.

Also discuss with the doctor the use of lecithin to lessen the mania.

Lecithin in Bipolar Disorder
  http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/2011/anxiety-and-the-autonomic-nervous-system/#Tr   
  http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/2011/research-evidence-for-hypoglycemia/#BIPOLARD


_______________________________________________
Jurriaan Plesman, Nutritional Psychotherapist.
Hon. Editor of
The Hypoglycemic Health Association of Australia.
http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au/
Author of "Getting off the Hook"
Freely available at Google Book Search
Skype: jurplesman

Bipolar Disorder

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Jurriaan Plesman, Nutritional Psychotherapist

Expertise

Have worked as a psychotherapist for overv twenty years, dealing with many personality disorders

Experience

I have a degree in Psychology from the Sydney University and a Postgraduate Diploma in Clinical Nutrition. I am also the author of “GETTING OFF THE HOOK” which deals with the nutritional and psychological treatment of personality disorders. It is freely available on the internet at Google Book Search. I am interested in the relationship between nutrition and behaviour, and as a Probation ans Parole Officer facilitated groups for offenders, many of whom were alcoholics and drug addicts, sex offenders or compulsive gamblers, as well as the whole gamut of “personality disorders”. I am also the ex-editor of the Hypoglycemic Health Association of Australia Newsletter, a quarterly publication dealing with hypoglycemia and related health problems. Its web site, together with a shortened course of PSYCHOTHERAPY can be visited at: http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au

Organizations
Editor of the Hypoglycemic Health Association of Australia. Its web site is at:

http://www.hypoglycemia.asn.au

Publications
Author of the book "Getting off the Hook", It is freely available on the internet at Google Book Search. My articles can be found at: https://docs.google.com/document/pub?id=1M3x0ciu21Q8-KJO3tcIuxE-Mn97OIxCKzuhHDY8umrU#id.m9k24s-yjf9sc

Education/Credentials
BA (Psych) (University of Sydney), Post Gad Dip Clin Nutr (International Academy of Nutrition)

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