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Brain Tumors/Anaplastic Astrocytoma Stage 3

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JShields wrote at 2011-01-04 19:32:48
Im an AAIII survivor. My tumor was on the opposite side (right frontal) and it was about the same size.  My tumor was discovered in 2005 (I was 34 w/2 young children) and my treatment began and ended in the spring of 2007. I received my treatment (surgery and radiation) at M.D. Anderson and they were not able to remove the entire visible tumor due to its location. My surgeon told me he got about 90% but my oncologist and the resident radiologist stated it was a little more than 70%.  I understand from research there may be microscopic tumor cells that cannot be seen so saying 100% on a diffuse astrocytoma really means they removed all they could see and/or detect from imaging. All research Ive done points survival rates to be directly correlated to the amount of tumor removed. My initial pathology report came back as a grade IV but there were characteristics about the tumor that did not meet the usual criteria; it did NOT have necrosis, there was no enhancement or mass affect, no vascular proliferation and the Ki67 Labeling was 0.07%. My oncologist ordered a 2nd opinion and it was downgraded to a grade III. With all of that said, I have had serial scans for almost 4 years with no re-occurrences and no noticeable cognitive or physical deficits.  I can certainly empathize with how you feel and my family and I went through a very similar experience and I believe we are stronger than ever in our new lives.  I advise you not to get caught up in statistics. Everyone is different and I believe a strong emotional will to survive/persevere is an important trait one (+family& friends)must develop  when going through a crisis of this magnitude.


gtarjohn wrote at 2011-01-05 01:13:52
Im an AAIII survivor. My tumor was on the opposite side (right frontal) and it was about the same size.  My tumor was discovered in 2005 (I was 34 w/2 young children) and my treatment began and ended in the spring of 2007. I received my treatment (surgery and radiation) at M.D. Anderson and they were not able to remove the entire visible tumor due to its location. My surgeon told me he got about 90% but my oncologist and the resident radiologist stated it was a little more than 70%.  I understand from research there may be microscopic tumor cells that cannot be seen so saying 100% on a diffuse astrocytoma really means they removed all they could see and/or detect from imaging. All research Ive done points survival rates to be directly correlated to the amount of tumor removed. My initial pathology report came back as a grade IV but there were characteristics about the tumor that did not meet the usual criteria; it did NOT have necrosis, there was no enhancement or mass affect, no vascular proliferation and the Ki67 Labeling was 0.07%. My oncologist ordered a 2nd opinion and it was downgraded to a grade III. With all of that said, I have had serial scans for almost 4 years with no re-occurrences and no noticeable cognitive or physical deficits.  I can certainly empathize with how you feel and my family and I went through a very similar experience and I believe we are stronger than ever in our new lives.  I advise you not to get caught up in statistics. Everyone is different and I believe a strong emotional will to survive/persevere is an important trait one (+family& friends)must develop  when going through a crisis of this magnitude.


karin wrote at 2011-01-18 05:13:16
My husband was diagnosed with a grade 3 astrocytoma in 1987. it was the size of a golf ball, the edema the size of a grapefruit.It was resected.External radiation for 6 weeks followed coupled with chemotherapy (BCNU) 3 days every 8 weeks for  a year.  The tumor recurred as a grade 4 11 months later.  He had a procedure which was EXPERIMENTAL in 1988 but is now considered standard and is done today at many cancer centers.  It was:  Stereotactic biopsy with laser resection, radio Istope (radioiodine 125) administered in pods inserted intersitially into the brain for either 7 or 10 days.  The pods are then removed.  THREE months later the necrotic tissue was removed.  Brain cells as we were told then DO NOT REGENERATE once killed, so unfortunately, good cells got killed with the bad ones.  He lost the use of his left arm completely, but is still here today.  Tho he can no longer work, he has lived to see both his sons grow up, and he himself is grateful every day for his life.

We weighed the pros and cons of this...for us for HIM it was the thing to do.  "stereotactic biopsy w/laser resection and radio iodine 125 implants administered INTERSTITIALLY within the brain, removed after 7-10 days, then a craniectomy in three months to removed necrotic tissue".  NEVER give up hope.ALWAYS hope.  the DOCTORS are speechless he has survived this long, with no explanation.   God bless, good luck.  Check with U of R in Rochester in NY, Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit  MI, Sloan Kettering,  


kll wrote at 2011-04-19 19:35:06
My husband was diagnoised with Grade 3 AA 4 years ago, surgery, chemo and radiation. Still doing fine. MRI's once a year now and hoping for the best. Do Not put a time on these tumors.


gtarjohn wrote at 2012-03-14 16:50:17
Now over a year has passed, how is he doing? I will pass 5 years post treatment this year. I have my routine scan at the end of this month (March)...crossing my fingers!


astro 3 wrote at 2013-10-10 04:19:28
dr.do nothing,  your an idiot !! there are several things that you can do after the first initial stage of chemo and radiation treatments !  


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Claes-Gustaf Nordquist, M.D.

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I`m a doctor of medicine and specialist in radiation therapy and medical oncology. I have a long time experience of these tumours.

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I'm a Doctor of Medicine and specialist in Medical Oncology and Radiation Therapy, educated and trained in Sweden. Now retired. Background in Radiation Therapy, Medical Oncology, Radiation Protection, Nuclear Medicine, Diagnostic Radiology, Gynecological Oncology, Clinical Pathology, Clinical Cytology,Hematology and Internal Medicine. M.D. from the faculty of medicine, Royal Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Have also been an exchange student at the Hebrew University, Hadassah Medical School, Jerusalem Israel. Former medical consultant, Swedish National Board of Radiation Protection. Former Police Surgeon and Medical Examiner, Stockholm Police Department. Former Chief Medical Officer, The Royal Guards, The Royal Horse Guards and the Royal Household Brigade, Royal Swedish Army Medical Corps. You can also reach me on: http://www.lifestylerescue.com/expert/health-fitness-advice/dr-claes-gustaf/128 . I have no restrictions on the number of questions there. I also answer questions about Oncology (General Cancer), General History, Military History, Breast Cancer, Colon Cancer.

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Doctor of medicine, specialist in medical oncology & radiation therapy.

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