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Question
Which one aspect of the eightfold path do you find hardest to incorporate into your life and why?

How does living in our modern materialistic world hinder you from following Buddhism as closely as you would like?

What do you think is the best method to staying true to the four noble truths especially the cessation of all wants and earthly desires?

Answer
> Which one aspect of the eightfold path do you find hardest
> to incorporate into your life and why?

Ask yourself, "What am I?" If you do so strongly and sincerely, a big "Don't Know" will appear. This "Don't Know" is before thinking, so it has no "I". This before-thinking mind is like a clear mirror that simply reflects what's in front of it: when red appears, the mirror is red; when white appears, only white.

Keep this clear mind, and use it moment to moment to help all beings. That's all. Don't worry about eightfold paths or anything else.

> How does living in our modern materialistic world hinder
> you from following Buddhism as closely as you would like?

If you think the modern world is materialistic, it means your mind is materialistic. Don't worry about judging the world, because what you think of as the world is created by your own thinking. Only attend to your own mind, find that clear before-thinking point, and act from that clarity moment to moment, trying to help all beings.

> What do you think is the best method to staying true
> to the four noble truths especially the cessation
> of all wants and earthly desires?

Sincerely ask "What am I?" You'll see that originally everything is empty, and "I" is just a thought, an idea that appears and disappears like clouds in the sky. If "I want something" appears in your mind, just let it appear and disappear, always returning to the great question "What am I?" and a clear, before-thinking "Don't Know."

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Stuart Resnick

Expertise

I'm a long-time practitioner in a Korean-style Zen school. I can answer questions regarding Zen, formal sitting meditation, self-inquiry, the practice of "koan" transmission, and offer the particular perspective of this school on the great life questions.

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18 years of formal practice with the Kwan Um School of Zen, currently with the Empty Gate Zen Center of Berkeley, currently a "Senior Dharma Teacher" at this center, I give periodic talks and informally answer questions of students interested in Zen practice and teaching style

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