You are here:

C++/BUILDIN EXE'S

Advertisement


Question
I DON'T KNOW IF YOU WOULD KNOW BUT IF YOU DON'T KNOW, CAN YOU DIRECT ME TO SOMEONE WHO KNOWS....
I AM LOOKIN FOR A FREE DOWNLOAD OF A PROGRAM THAT ENABLES ME TO CREATE PROGRAMS (EXE'S).
I AM INTERESTED IN MAKING MY OWN EXE FILE (LIKE A GAME FOR STARTERS).
WHAT IS IT CALLED? WHERE CAN I GET SUCH A PROGRAM? THE PROGRAM MUST BE EASY TO USE FOR I AM A BEGINNER.
THANKS

Answer
First, netiquette, please do not SHOUT! Use of all upper case is considered rude and like shouting.

As to creating executable code - well there are many ways to do this and many free and not free tools to allow you to do this.

However, do not expect to be able to create games from the word go. Its like trying to run before you can walk or trying to read novels before you know your letters. You have to learn the techniques required to develop programs in general and those specific type of applications you are interested in - and games can require experience in many areas, and not all of them just IT related - graphics, audio, strategy, data handling, networking, artificial intelligence, simulation etc. as well as media production techniques - you have to create the music, graphics, animations etc that your game requires. Then on top of all this you need to be familiar with the tools and programming language(s) you intend to use to implement your project. I have been developing software for over 25 years and I am still learning.

As you are asking in a C/C++ area I of course am familiar with some C/C++ development tools. One that is free and popular for learning on MS Windows is the Bloodshed Dev-C++ (and Delphi it appears from their site) - see the site at http://www.bloodshed.net/c/index.html. It also has a list of free compilers (a compiler is a type of computer language translator program that converts the computer language text into something the computer understands) - see http://www.bloodshed.net/compilers/index.html.

The output of a C or C++ compiler, as well as compilers for many other languages, produce at the end of the build process a native executable for the operating system and processor the program is intended to be run on (not always the same as the one used to create the executable, but in your case probably will be). Note that the traditional compilation process produces a translated code output file for each translated source language code file - these then have to be linked together (and together with any required library code) to form an executable using a link loader program.

Other options are:

Interpreted languages including script and macro languages:

Examples are Perl, Python and Visual Basic for Applications - where you run the code text through a program that interprets the language there and then and this program takes the appropriate action. Even DOS box batch files are scripts that are interpreted - in this case by the DOS command.com command processor or the Windows NT/2000/XP cmd.exe command processor.


Virtual Machine environments and languages that use them:

Examples are Sun's Java and Java virtual machine or Microsoft's .NET languages - C#, Visual Basic .NET and the like and the Common Language Runtime. These are part way between the two previous cases - the code is compiled to an intermediate machine language for some abstract virtual processing machine and this is interpreted or in some cases compiled just before it is executed (called just in time compilation or JIT compilation) to run on an actual processor under a specific operating system.

However at the end of the day the lines between these distinctions can become blurred - there are .NET versions of Perl for example and I have seen compilers for command processor scripts. On the other side I heard about an interpreted C++ learning environment...

Java development environments are freely available although I am not an expert on all of them you might like to check out the Sun Java site at http://java.sun.com/ and see what you can find - I downloaded a community edition of their Java development environment a couple of years ago but things would have moved on from then.

As you seem interested in games you might like to check out Dark Basic - I know very little about this product except that my brother mentioned it to me as being good for creating games. See http://darkbasic.thegamecreators.com/. However it does not look to be free - although there is a free download for an evaluation version.

As a beginner you should start by under standing the basics of computing and how programs are created and executed and how programs are developed: design, implementation, testing. Edit code, compile and link code, debug code, etc... There are many resources - books, courses, online resources. You might like to look at the ACCU site at http://www.accu.org/ - they have resource links and book reviews and even mentored developer projects for members. Next you can try querying you favourite search engine - such as Google.  

C++

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Ralph McArdell

Expertise

I am a software developer with more than 15 years C++ experience and over 25 years experience developing a wide variety of applications for Windows NT/2000/XP, UNIX, Linux and other platforms. I can help with basic to advanced C++, C (although I do not write just-C much if at all these days so maybe ask in the C section about purely C matters), software development and many platform specific and system development problems.

Experience

My career started in the mid 1980s working as a batch process operator for the now defunct Inner London Education Authority, working on Prime mini computers. I then moved into the role of Programmer / Analyst, also on the Primes, then into technical support and finally into the micro computing section, using a variety of 16 and 8 bit machines. Following the demise of the ILEA I worked for a small company, now gone, called Hodos. I worked on a part task train simulator using C and the Intel DVI (Digital Video Interactive) - the hardware based predecessor to Indeo. Other projects included a CGI based train simulator (different goals to the first), and various other projects in C and Visual Basic (er, version 1 that is). When Hodos went into receivership I went freelance and finally managed to start working in C++. I initially had contracts working on train simulators (surprise) and multimedia - I worked on many of the Dorling Kindersley CD-ROM titles and wrote the screensaver games for the Wallace and Gromit Cracking Animator CD. My more recent contracts have been more traditionally IT based, working predominately in C++ on MS Windows NT, 2000. XP, Linux and UN*X. These projects have had wide ranging additional skill sets including system analysis and design, databases and SQL in various guises, C#, client server and remoting, cross porting applications between platforms and various client development processes. I have an interest in the development of the C++ core language and libraries and try to keep up with at least some of the papers on the ISO C++ Standard Committee site at http://www.open-std.org/jtc1/sc22/wg21/.

Education/Credentials

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.