You are here:

Calculus/Chemistry/Calculus

Advertisement


Question
How big of a snowball in meters could I make if I used all of the snow off of my driveway after a large snowfall. My driveway is 285 feet long by 7.6 feet wide. Snowfall that day was 3.5 inches deep.

Answer
Steps:  1)  Find the volume of snow on your driveway: using l x w x h (remember to convert every length to meters)
    V = 4/3 * Pi * r^3
2)  use that and divide it by 4 Pi.
3)  then multiply by 3.
4)  then take the cube-root of the result.

so here goes:

Volume of snow on driveway = (285 feet) * (7.6 feet) * (3.5 inches)
         = (285 feet) * (7.6 feet) * (0.2916666 feet)
         = (285 * 0.3048  meters)  * (7.6 * 0.3048 meters) * (0.2916666 * 0.3048 meters)
         = 17.8892 cubic meters

So if 17.8892 = 4/3 * Pi * r^3
then  17.8892 / (4 Pi)   = 1/3 * r^3
and therefore r^3 = 3 * 17.8892 / (4 Pi)  = 4.2707

Hence, r = 1.6224  (this is the cube root of 4.2707

Therefore the radius of the huge spherical snow ball is 1.6224 meters.

Calculus

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Amos

Expertise

I can answer all calculus question. I am a Math Lecturer and I teach Math in a College, usually Calculus 1, Calculus 2 and Calculus 3 and Linear Algebra.

Experience

I have been teaching in this college for more than 12 years. Prior to that, I taught for three years as Visiting Assistant Professor.

Education/Credentials
I got my doctorate from Univ. of Rochester in Algebraic Toppology. I got a MA from Univ of Rochester, an MA from York Univ. in Toronto and almost did my M.Sc in the National Univ. of Singapore.

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.