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Question
I am wanting to get a major in sports management/administration and my minor in game and graphics designer for maybe an IT job.I am wanting to get in the sports field (scout,agent,GM) and if that does not succeed try to get an IT job in Game or Graphics Designer.Any tips,is my plan bad,if it is give me more degree options and a different plan.
     Thanks,
         Gabe

Answer
GABE,
PLEASE  TAKE  APTITUDE/ ATTITUDE  TESTS ETC.

THEN TAKE SPORTS  MANAGEMENT.

LATER  ON  YOU CAN TAKE  ‘’IT DIPLOMA  ;   TO SUPPORT  YOUR  MANAGEMENT  SKILLS.




SPORTS MANAGEMENT process: Planning, Organizing, Staffing, Directing, Co-Ordinating, Reporting and Budgeting.
the elements of  are as follows:
•   Planning, that is working out in broad outline the things that need to be done and the methods for doing them to accomplish the purpose set for the enterprise;
•   Organizing, that is the establishment of the formal structure of authority through which work subdivisions are arranged, defined, and co-ordinated for the defined objective;
•   Staffing, that is the whole personnel function of bringing in and training the staff and maintaining favorable conditions of work;
•   Directing, that is the continuous task of making decisions and embodying them in specific and general orders and instructions and serving as the leader of the enterprise;
•   Co-ordinating, that is the all important duty of interrelating the various parts of the work;
•   Reporting, that is keeping those to whom the executive is responsible informed as to what is going on, which thus includes keeping himself and his subordinates informed through records, research, and inspection;
•   Budgeting, with all that goes with budgeting in the form of planning, accounting and control.
Elaborations
.
Under Organizing,  emphasized the division and specialization of labor in a manner that will increase efficiency.  that there are three limitations to division of labor. The first occurs when labor is divided to the point where any one task in the division of labor would require less than the full-time of a worker, in which case a worker may need to be employed in other tasks to fill up their time. The second limitation to division of labor arises from technology and custom, where certain tasks may only be handled by certain workers either because of a lack of technological means or customs at the time. THIS  gives the example of a single worksite in which only plumbers do the plumbing work and electricians do the electrical work, though this may not take up their full work time. Work in these areas could be re-combined in a manner to increase efficiency, however union considerations could prevent this. The third limitation to division of labor is that it must not pass beyond physical division into organic division, or intricately related activities must not be separated from each other. AND  gives the example that while it may seem more efficient to have the front end of a cow grazing in pasture at all times and the back half being milked at all times, this would not work due to the intricate connection between the halves that is needed for the whole to function.
note that organization of specialized workers can be done in four ways which are:
•   By the purpose the workers are serving, such as furnishing water, providing education, or controlling crime.  lists these in his organizational tables as vertical organizations.
•   By the process the workers are using, such as engineering, doctoring, lawyering, or statistics. Gulick lists these in his organizational tables as horizontal organizations.
•   By the clientelle or material or the persons or things being dealt with, such as immigrants, veterans, forests, mines, or parks in government; or such as a department store's furniture department, clothing department, hardware department, or shoe department in the private sector.
•   By the place where the workers do their work.
BE careful to recognize that these modes of organization can often cross, forming a complex and interrelated organizational structure where organizations like schools will include workers and professionals not in the field of education such as doctors or nurses, janitors, secretaries, police departments might include non-police professionals, a shoe department including buyers as well as salespeople, etc.
Under Coordination,  notes that two methods can be used to achieve coordination of divided labor. The first is by organization, or placing workers under managers who coordinate their efforts. The second is by dominance of an idea, where a clear idea of what needs to be done is developed in each worker, and each worker fits their work to the needs of the whole.  notes that these two ideas are not mutually exclusive, and that most enterprises function best when both are utilized.
notes that any manager will have a finite amount of time and energy, and discusses span of control under coordination.,  notes that the number of subordinates that can be handled under any single manager will depend on factors such as organizational stability, the specialization of the subordinates and whether their manager comes from the same field or specialty, and space.

Also under coordination, as well as organization,  emphasizes the theory of unity of command, that each worker should only have one direct superior so as to avoid confusion and inefficiency.
Fayol's fourteen principles of management are as follows:
•   Division of Work
•   Authority and Responsibility
•   Discipline
•   Unity of Command
•   Unity of Direction
•   Subordination of Individual Interest to General Interest
•   Remuneration of Personnel
•   Centralization
•   Scalar Chain (line of authority with peer level communication)
•   Order
•   Equity
•   Stability of Tenure of Personnel
•   Initiative
•   Esprit de Corps
Fayol's influence upon Gulick is readily apparent in the five elements of management discussed in his book, which are:
•   Planning - examining the future and drawing up plans of actions
•   Organizing - building up the structure (labor and material) of the undertaking
•   Command - maintaining activity among the personnel
•   Co-ordination - unifying and harmonizing activities and efforts
•   Control - seeing that everything occurs in conformity with policies and practices
The Olympic values . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
The importance of sport to society . . . . . . . . . . .
The benefits of sport to individuals . . . . . . . . . . .
Sport for all . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Inclusion and equity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Athlete support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Protecting young athletes . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethical issues of doping . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Fair play . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Violence and harassment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Ethics in sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Government and sport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Arbitration and dispute resolution . . . . . . .
Sport and peace – Olympic Truce . . . . . . . . . . . .
Olympic culture and education . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ENVIRONMENTAL SUSTAINABILITY . . . . . . . . . . .
Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGEMENT SKILLS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
COMMUNICATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
LEADERSHIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SOLVING PROBLEMS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MAKING DECISIONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGING TIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGING MEETINGS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGING CONFLICT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
 MANAGING THE ENVIRONMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . .
THE OPERATING ENVIRONMENT OF SPORT ORGANISATIONS . . . . . . . .
WORKING IN PARTNERSHIP . . . . . . . . . . .
GOVERNANCE OF SPORT ORGANISATIONS
KEY ROLES IN SPORT ORGANISATIONS . .
CONSTITUTION OF AN ORGANISATION . . .
HEALTH AND SAFETY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROTECTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGEMENT of resources . . . . . . . . .
STRATEGIC PLANNING . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGING PEOPLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ASSESSING STAFF AND VOLUNTEER TRAINING NEEDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT AND BUDGETING . . . . . SOURCES OF FUNDS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY . . . . . . . . .
PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT AND EVALUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGEMENT of activities . . . . . . . . .
PROJECT MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PROMOTION AND SPONSORSHIP . . . . . .
RISK MANAGEMENT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
PLANNING A SPORT TRIP . . . . . . . . . . . .
ORGANISING AN EVENT . . . . . . . . . . . . .
MANAGING AND OPERATING FACILITIES .  Developing elite athletes . . . . . . . . . .
SPORT MEDICINE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
ANTI-DOPING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
SPORT SCIENCE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TECHNOLOGY IN SPORT . . . . . . . . . . . .
DEVELOPING TECHNICAL LEADERSHIP . .
DEVELOPING ATHLETES . . . . . . . . . . . . .
TALENT IDENTIFICATION  

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