Careers: Military--Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines, Coast Guard/medal/ribbon replacement

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My apologies for waiting so long to request replacement.My local V.A. replaced 2 medals/ribbons that never made it to my home when I mailed them just prior to separation from the USN(honorable discharge).The V.A. said they could not get the Viet Nam Campaign Medal.They sent me this e-mail address & suggested I see what that turns up.Also I feel I should have gotten a Good Conduct Medal upon separation,but did not.The C.O. aboard the Cvan 65 USS Enterprise extended my enlistment, as experienced EM's were in short supply & that I was in a "Criticle Rating' for the Enteprise's needs AT THAT TIME.My enlistment was from Nov.'68/Nov.'72.I was separated in May of '73.I believe that needs to be considered in issuing  the Good Conduct Meal.However I would still,very much,like to have the Viet Nam Service Campaign Medal replaced-if possible.I sincerely appriciate your advocating in my behalf,for these medals.Thankyou,Sir.In your debt,Stephen Grant Parish,USN.

Answer
Stephen,
I am not, and have never been an advocate.  I just know how to get things done.   You have several choices.  If you're impatient or need them in a hurry, you can go to the web site for "Medals of America" and simply buy whatever you need.   Their web address is http://www.medalsofamerica,com    You can buy anything you need there for just a few dollars, like an official Navy Clothing Sales Store at the NavEx or an AAFES Clothing  Sales Store and the prices are pretty comparable.  Just be careful and don’t award  yourself a Medal of Honor, or a bronze star, etc.  There’s an official organization that watches out for that sort of thing.

FYI - The Stolen Valor Act of 2005, signed into law by President George W. Bush on December 20, 2006,  was a U.S. law that broadened the provisions of previous U.S. law addressing the unauthorized wear, manufacture, or sale of any military decorations and medals. The law made it a federal misdemeanor to falsely represent oneself as having received any U.S. military decoration or medal. If convicted, defendants might have been imprisoned for up to six months, unless the decoration lied about is the Medal of Honor, in which case imprisonment could be up to one year.
The Stolen Valor Act of 2013 is a United States federal law that was passed by the United States stolen valor and “guard  against imposters of pretended patriotism.”   The Stolen Valor Act of 2005, signed into law by President George W. Bush on 20 December 2006, was a U.S. law that broadened the provisions of previous U.S. law addressing the unauthorized wear, manufacture, or sale of any military decorations and medals. The law made it a federal misdemeanor to falsely represent oneself as having received any U.S. military decoration or medal.   If convicted, defendants might have been imprisoned for up to congress.. The law amends the federal criminal code to make it a crime for a person to fraudulently claim having received any of a series of particular military decorations with the intention of did receive that award. This law is a revised version of the previous one.

Now that you’ve been informed of what’s  legal, I can’t imagine anyone objecting to a good conduct medal nor can I imagine anyone knowing how many oak leaf clusters you’re supposed to  be wearing. specifically denied it..  J’m sure you  would know if you were specifically denied it.  So you probably should’ve been wearing it anyway.  Otherwise you’d  have to find his whereaabouts and have him sign a petition to the Board for Correctiion of Naval Records in  Arlington, VA, stating your records are incorrec t and should be ammended.
Plus I’m  sure the time for correcting has expired.  So in short, I’d go ahead and wear those two.  Should anyone ever question you, tell them a colonel  (me) said you should weae the.
Congratulations,
Colonel  Howell

Careers: Military--Army, Navy, Airforce, Marines, Coast Guard

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MARK A. HOWELL

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All military questions, any Service. 30 years experience & two Ph.D.'s. 4 times Base Commander. Worked with Army, Navy, USMC, USCG and several foreign military units. Veteran of Kosovo, Bosnia, Macedonia, Kuwait, Iraq, Afghanistan, and 10 civil wars in Africa.

Experience

Air Force Colonel with 30 years experience. Air Force Base Commander 4 times. Highly decorated.

Organizations
Org of Am Historians, Wild West History Assoc., Disabled American Veterans - Life Member, Am Motorcyclist Assoc. - Life Member, North Am Hunt Club - Life Member, NWTF - Life Member

Publications
Numerous book reviews published in the Journal of American History. Two books submitted for publication. Co-Author of two more. Eisenhower memorial Library (interview with U.S. Presidential chaffeur

Education/Credentials
Ph.D. in military history, Columbus University (Summa Cum Laude) Ph.D. in history, London, England (Summa Cum Laude) Master of Arts degree in history, Marshall University, WV Bachelors degree, double-major in history and mathematics, Salem College, WV Air War College, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL Air Command and Staff College, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL Squadron Officer School, Maxwell Air Force Base, AL

Awards and Honors
Legion of Merit, Defense MSM, 5 Meritous Service Medals,Joint Commendation Medal AF Commendation Medal Army Commendation Joint Achievement Medal AF Achievement Medal Outstanding Volunteer Medal Total of 33 Medals and 43 Ribbons

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