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Question
Dear Ken

Recently I tore the skin in between my finger name and the flesh area, right where the two borders. I immediately had it attended to by a nurse, who cleaned it with more than one substance before finally wrapping it. Now this minor treatment was not really painful, well bearly. Now, just after stepping out of the camp clinic I started feeling very ill, and I knew this bad feeling was connected to the dressing of my finger which just took place, for this is not the first time I had to endure these faint feelings even while minor injuries are treated. Now, after feeling ill, I sat somewhere and the feelings grew far worse to the extent that I began sweating a lot, and just could not remain still, and even had to decline help to go to the nurse, for I felt quite sure that had I stood up I would have passed out even while being assisted. In a little after 5 minutes the feelings went, and a little of it remained for a few hours until later in the evening it went completely. Now over the years I have been wondering what causes these feelings when my injuries are attended to. Years ago I saw a mother attending to her son's injury. Now when I saw the pair of scissors in her hands, I immediately fell ill, and remained ill until I left work. Can you explain this kind of experience to me, and what causes them and how I can overcome them? Many thanks in anticipation of your soon reply.

Your truly
David

Answer
David:

This forum is really focused on careers in nursing, however I will give you my opinion.

I can tell you that this is mind over matter. It most likely stems from underlying fear of something you witnessed probably at a young age. Possibly that mother attending to her sons minor injury. This feeling of fear can stimulate the vagus nerve and you get a vasovagal reaction that can cause these symptoms of feeling like passing out or actually passing out. The best thing to do is to avoid those situations or take your mind off of the situation.

Another thing to do it to sit down or lye down during the episode so you don't fall and hurt yourself and by laying down the blood can still get to your brain so you prevent passing out. After all, passing out is nothing more than the blood and glucose not being able to get to the brain after your vessels dilate from this vasovagal response ...then you pass out and lay flat...the blood and glucose circulates back the brain easier as you lay flat on the ground. Then you normally wake up on your own...unless ofcourse you get a major head injury from the fall.  

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/vasovagal-syncope/basics/definitio

Don't worry just avoid those situations that make you queasy and sit or lay down once you get that feeling.

Good Luck!

Careers: Nursing

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Ken , BSN, RN, CCRN, MICN

Expertise

I can answer questions regarding all aspects of Nursing as a career in general. If you need help deciding if nursing is a career for you, then let me help you with your decision. As an added bonus, I can answer your questions from the perspective of being a man in nursing who has a wife that is also a nurse. Men is nursing is more accepted today than it was when I began in 1993. Regardless of your gender, Nursing has so much to offer and is among the most respected professions of our time. I have been a registered nurse since 1993 and have been certified in Critical Care nursing since 1996. I am currently a full-time Critical Care Ground Transport Nurse/Mobile Intensive Care Nurse(MICN). I am working per diem as a night Shift Administrator/Nursing Supervisor.

Experience

My experience over the years since 1993 have been spent between the Emergency Room and the Critical Care Units. More recently since 2007 I have been working in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) as a Critical Care Transport Nurse/Mobile Intensive Care Nurse(MICN)/Emergency Medical Technician(EMT). This unit is known as the Specialty Care Transport Unit(SCTU). I transport all age populations with critical medical problems from Hospital A to Hospital B in the back of an ambulance. My job is to make sure this patient remains in the same or better condition and to handle any emergency that may arise during the over the road transport. BLS/ACLS/PALS/NRP/ITLS Certified Provider.

Organizations
American Association of Critical Care Nurses Honor Society of Nursing, Upsilon Rho Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau International

Education/Credentials
BSN,Nursing/Pursuing MSN in Nursing Administration Critical Care Registered Nurse(CCRN)/ Mobile Intensive Care Nurse (MICN)/ Emergency Medical Technician (EMT)/ AAS Business Management

Awards and Honors
American Ambulance Association-2009 Star of Life Recipient

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