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Chrysler Repair/'97 Sebring: no start, no fuel, no spark

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QUESTION: 97 sebring convertible turns over no fire or fuel tried the odometer test said no bus keeps blowing AMD fuse as soon as I put it in can I bypass amd ?

ANSWER: Hi Steve,
Can you tell me more specifics about the "AMD" fuse: which fuse box is it in, how many amps, what does "AMD" mean"? Are you perhaps describing the ASD (Auto-shutdown) fuse? Is there a number on the fuse socket, or a name? I would not by-pass the fuse as you may cause damage to the wiring which would carry excessive current by doing so.
I don't want to mislead you by mis-identifying which fuse is blowing.
Do you have the 4 cyl or 6 cyl engine? Is there any relevant history to this problem?
If this is indeed fuse #5 (20 amp, 3rd row from the front, outboard) in the power box in the engine compartment then that one is the ASD fuse which powers: the powertrain control module (and thus the "no bus"), the distributor, the fuel injectors, the generator, the egr solenoid, and the heated oxygen sensors.
The resistance to ground at the points where the dark green/orange lead from that fuse connects to each of those items will need to be checked out to find out which is shorted. I would look first at the upstream heated oxygen sensor which is located at the midline/top of the exhaust manifold of the rear bank of cylinders and which looks like a spark plug and which has very fragile wires from the electrical plug to the tip of the sensors. One of those wires could be broken/shorted to ground.  
Or you could disconnect all of the devices I listed, and put in a fuse. Then plug them in one at a time (and turn the key to the run position with each new re-connect, then turn off and insert the next re-connect, etc.) to see which one blows the fuse. The ASD relay is powered for about a second every time you turn the key to 'run' and that would blow the fuse if the device you plugged in was shorted to ground. That would ID which one is blowing the fuse
Do you have a volt-ohm meter which would be the other way to find out which of the devices is shorting out?
Please read the PS (below) and respond to it now.
Thanks,
Roland


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Hi Roland,yeah sorry about the amd thing yes it it was and is the asd fuse blowing evertime I put one in.checked the o2 sensors they are new from what I feel and see.I have a volt ohm meter and have 12v at fuse and relay checked and replaced back fuel rail wire gets pretty hot under that manifold I guess.You metioned noise surpressor where is that located? and alternater field on these motors I've read are a part of this somehow right?

Answer
Hi Steve,
Though you didn't say I will assume this is a 2.5L V-6 engine because you mentioned a "back fuel rail wire under the manifold. But then you asked about a noise suppressor but there is no suppressor on the V-6, just on the 2.4L 4 cylinder engine. I'll continue assuming you have the V-6.
Because you have a volt-ohm meter that will help to find the short that is blowing the ASD fuse. The best approach would be to measure the resistance to ground at the outboard pin socket of the ASD relay after removing the relay. That socket is number "89" and it should read 0 ohm to ground, i.e. a dead short. Then you will want to disconnect one at a time all those items which are connected to that pin (all via a dark green/orange wire) until you find one that causes the resistance to go up from 0. Here is the list:
fuse # 1 in the power distribution box
the powertrain control module (the plug that has pins 1-40)
the generator two wire plug (one of which dark green/orange)
the one wire plug at the distributor
the plug at the egr solenoid
the 6 fuel injector plugs
the upstream (on the manifold) heated oxygen sensor
When you find the item that is causing a 0 reading at pin 89 of the ASD relay socket that should be considered the item that needs to be replaced..
If you don't find such an item, then the dark green/orange wires that go to all those items will need to be examined to find a short in the insulation.
I look forward to your progress report and further questions.
Thank you so much for your rating and especially your 'nomination' of me for volunteer of the month. If you would repeat that process again, particularly the 'nomination', I would be most pleased. I am in close competition for that recognition.
Roland

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Roland Finston

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Get a Free Fast answer to your repair question about a Chrysler/Dodge/Plymouth car, minivan, SUV, or truck. Problems with electronically controlled engines and transmissions as well as body wiring problems are my specialty. This free troubleshoot advice forum helps you diagnose faults, minimize repair costs or do-it-yourself.

I answer questions seven days a week and respond to you in about 30 minutes. "Maxed Out" means I am answering another question, briefly unavailable, or asleep overnight, so try again later.

I have do-it-yourself experience (50+ years) and a library of 100 1982-2012 Chrysler factory shop manuals and 20 multi-manual Chrysler Corp. CD's.

I was voted "Top Expert" 2010-2015, here at AllExperts, and have answered 20,000+ questions.

Experience

Five decades as a 'do-it-yourselfer' on domestic and imported cars.

Organizations
Yahoo Autos Group called The Chrysler Lebaron Club (co-moderator)

Education/Credentials
Advanced degrees in Physics/bruised knuckles

Awards and Honors
"Top expert" of 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014 and 2015 here at Allexperts. Quickest "average response time" at Allexperts (currently no. 1).

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