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College Football/scoring play reviews

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Question
In the NCAA when is a scoring play supposed to be reviewed?

Thank you

Answer

Chris,
Thank you for your question. Under NCAA Football Rules for Replay [Rule 12]  Reviewable plays involving a potential score are reviewable. Replay may always review the position of the ball in relation to the Goal line.  Scoring Plays are governed by   Rule 12 Section 3 ARTICLE 1. Reviewable plays involving a potential score include:
A potential touchdown or safety. [Exception: Safety by penalty for fouls that are not specifically reviewable.]  Field goal attempts if and only if the ball is ruled (a) below or above the crossbar or (b) inside or outside the uprights when it is lower than the top of the uprights. If the ball is higher than the top of the uprights as it crosses the end line, the play may not be reviewed.

The instant replay process operates under the fundamental assumption that the ruling on the field is correct. The replay official may reverse a ruling if and only if the video evidence convinces him beyond all doubt that the ruling was incorrect. Without such indisputable video evidence, the replay official must allow the ruling to stand.  The replay official and his crew shall review every play of a game. He may stop a game at any time before the ball is next legally put in play (Exception: Rule 12-3-5-c) whenever he believes that:
1. There is reasonable evidence to believe an error was made in the initial on-field ruling.
2. The play is reviewable.
3. The outcome of a review would have a direct, competitive impact on the game.

The head coach of either team may request that the game be stopped and a play be reviewed by challenging the on-field ruling.
1. A head coach initiates this challenge by taking a team timeout before the ball is next legally put in play (Exception: Rule 12-3-5-c) and informing the referee that he is challenging the ruling of the previous play. If a head coach's challenge is successful, he retains the challenge, which he may use only once more during the game. Thus, a coach may have a total of two challenges if and only if his initial challenge is successful.
2. After a review has been completed, if the on-field ruling is reversed, that team's timeout will not be charged.
3. After a review has been completed, and the on-field ruling is not reversed, the charged team timeout counts as one of the three permitted that team for that half or the one permitted in that extra period.
4. A head coach may not challenge a ruling in which the game was stopped and a decision has already been made by the replay official.
5. If a head coach requests a team timeout to challenge an on-field ruling and the play being challenged is not reviewable, the timeout shall count as one of the three permitted his team during that half of the game or the one permitted in that extra period.
6. A head coach may not challenge an on-field ruling if all the team's timeouts have been used for that half or in that extra period.  

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Vic Winnek

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