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Conservatives/living, breathing Constitution

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QUESTION: I am a conservative who is still baffled at the concept of the "living, breathing Constitution" as put forth by conservatives. The conservative argument seems to be that if the Constitution is changed sufficiently (a "living" document) then it will eventually cease to resemble what it was originally. Or am I misunderstanding their argument? Are they perhaps referring not to changing the document but interpreting it? (what judges do all the time) As for changing the document, isn't the amendment process an accepted, legal means of changing the Constitution? In other words, isn't the amendment process an admission that the Constitution is a "living, breathing" document? Please enlighten me.

ANSWER: You attribute the "living, breathing Constitution" school of thought to the wrong side. It is the Liberals that believe the Constitution can be interpreted from the perspective of the times that we live in.

Conservatives are (or should be) strict Constitutionalists that the words are what they mean, and not open to the flights of fancy that the Democrats (usually) want to give them.

Such wide interpretation, would indeed make the Constitution very much react to the whim of the times.

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: OK, I phrased my question wrongly. I meant that I am baffled at the counter-argument conservatives make to the "living breathing" concept of the Constitution. So, to clarify, the conservative argument seems to be that if the Constitution is changed sufficiently (a "living" document) then it will eventually cease to resemble what it was originally. Isn't the amendment process an accepted, legal means of changing the Constitution? In other words, and therefore, doesn't the amendment process render the Constitution is a "living, breathing" document?

Answer
Yes, technically speaking, the amendment process exists to make the Constitution a "living" document. The problem for the Leftists, is that it is too difficult to change. There have been over 10,000 amendments submitted for ratification, and only a handful made it.

It's easier to interpret the Constitution as a "living, etc.," than it is to amend it.

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