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QUESTION: Respected Sir,

1) what things need to check or what procedure need to adopt if the incoming batsman makes delay more than 3 min to take the guard to be ready at other end so that his partner will be ready to receive the next delivery and the fielding side makes appeal ?

2) How to respond to such an appeal ?

3) If, for the mentioned batsman the decision is justified as out when the batsman come on field to bat, then what what will be the
procedure for the next batsman if he too make delay to come on to the field ?

4) what things to follow , if possible consideration of refusal of play comes true ? what is protracted delay in this case ?


Thanks,
Mayur Wankhade.

ANSWER: Dear Mayur,

This is a very good question and is covered under Law-31, Timed out. This Law is very much there to avoid unnecessary waste of time. I have not come across any such incident. But the Law is very much required to make the cricketers aware that how quickly they have to reach to the wicket when a wicket falls. This is applicable to all format of games except T20-format, where a batsman has to make to the crease in 90 seconds.

Law 31 of the Laws of cricket provides that an incoming batsman must be in position to take guard or for his partner to be ready to receive the next ball within three minutes of the fall of the previous wicket. If this requirement is not met, the incoming batsman will be given out, timed out, on appeal.

The "incoming batsman" may be any batsman who has not yet batted. There is no prescribed batting order in cricket. If no batsman has set foot on the field when the appeal is made, the batting captain may pick any player who has not yet batted as the one to be given out.[1] As a result, if the next batsman was only slightly delayed, the captain would be expected to sacrifice his worst batsman—usually the No. 11.

If there is protracted delay in which no batsman comes to the wicket so that the umpires consider that the batting team is refusing to play, the umpires will award the match to the other team. If, however, no player comes to the wicket because all eligible players are unable to bat (e.g. through injury or illness) then they are not given out timed out; instead the innings is declared closed and 'absent ill/injured/hurt/dead[2]' is noted next to those players' names as appropriate.

A new shortened version of cricket, Twenty20 cricket, stipulates that a batsman must be on the field within 90 seconds, rather than the three minutes specified in the Laws. As a result of this rule, rather than sitting in the pavilion, the batsman next in are positioned on a bench on the boundary rather like other team sports such as association football and rugby.

It is both the umpires who have to confirm the elapsing of 3 minutes. In fact, they have to note down the time of fall of each wicket, to enable them to decide if the next batsman arrives late and takes more than 3 minutes.

Within 3 minutes the next batsman has to reach to the crease and be ready to take strike or if not, his colleague must be ready to take the strike.

But fielding side feels 3 minutes have been elapsed, they can appeal to the bowler's end umpire. On appeal both umpires will check with their timing. When they decide 3 minutes have been elapsed, they will wait for  the next batsman to step on tho the field of play, and then the bowler's end umpire will declare him 'Timed out'.

A batsman cannot be given out until his innings has started. The umpires must therefore ensure that the next batsman is on the field of play when giving the decision out.

If no batsman appears at all, umpires must not allow play to be held up for too long. There may be reasons of such delay first. Batting side may be refusing to play. As per Law 21.3, they must investigate the reason of delay. The ball was dead when last wicket fell and umpire must have the possession of the ball.

Now before leaving the ground, 'Time' must be called, as the prolonged delay is to be considered as interruption. The time lost for such investigation will be counted after 3 minutes have been elapsed since last wicket fell.

If NO Appeal is made, it will now be too late. Umpires will visit the pavilion to discover the cause of delay.

(i) If action considered a refusal warn, captain
   If action persists, award the match to the fielding side, under refusal to play

(2) If action not considered a refusal
   Set time for play to resume
   Jointly calculate time lost

The time taken to probe the matter is called "Investigation time", which shall be counted from the call of 'Time" to the next call of "Play". This investigation time will be added before the normal close of time. The scheduled close of time will be revised. On the last day, the same will be added before the last hour begins. The  last hour accordingly will be rescheduled.

If appeal is made,

It must be answered and an incoming batsman is to be given out, whether play continues or not.
The umpires will so inform the captain of the batting side. The captain will decide which batsman is out. The scorers should also be informed.

After a batsman is dismissed "Timed out" as above, the next 3 minutes will start from the time of appeal was upheld. And from that point of time 3 minutes will be counted for the next batsman.

(4) Refusal of play is covered under Law-21.3, (Umpires awarding a match)
A match shall be lost by a side which

either  (i) concedes defeat
      (ii) in the opinion of umpires refuse to play and umpires shall award the match to the other side.


Hope this will clear your all doubts and this will be a great help to you. Still you have any doubts, please get back to me.

With best wishes,

Suhas Sapre (Baroda 20/03/2013)



---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Respected Sir,

Thank you for such a wonderful explanation. The youngsters expect the same from their Gurus in their early carrier.

I wanted to clear certain things now

For No appeal made scenario :

1) So when 3 minutes time has elapsed, and umpires considers that the delay is too much then to investigate the cause of such delay they will leave the ground calling "TIME" , and since TIME has been called any appeal made after that will not be valid, RIGHT ?

2) so in this case if the reason for cause of delay is acceptable then we will add this investigation time to end of days play and no batsmen will be TIMED OUT since appeal was not made within its time limit (i.e before calling TIME by bowler's end umpire) , RIGHT ?

For appeal made scenario :

1) In this case if the after the elapse of 3 min of time ( and no batsmen appear on field), fielding side made an appeal then umpire will cross check with each other that 3 min time has elapsed or not , if elapsed they will consider the appeal , RIGHT ?

2) now taking into mind that appeal is valid and 3 min time has elapsed, so appeal must have to answer irrespective of any investigation , RIGHT ? ( i mean why batsman got delay , he slides down the pavilion staires or get it difficult to come on field due to other acceptable reasons)

3) My concern here is , even if 3 min elapsed and appeal is valid , but on the other side batsman's delay reason is also valid and acceptable , then what to do ?

4) umpires must need to wait for the incoming batsman to come on to field as batsman innings commence when he first steps on to the field , right?

5) who ever come , give him out , note down the time for next 3 min calculation, RIGHT ?

6) If no one come , go for investigation calling TIME and kipping in mind that one of remaining batsman is out for sure and ask captain who is that one and now note down the three min time for next TIME OUT calculation , RIGHT ?

 
Sorry for too many questions , the thing is these questions will arise only when you are on the way to understand the things and intentions behind the law .

I have asked 2 questions for the NO APPEAL scenario and 6 for the APPEAL MADE scenario , it will be very great if you answer all those in same sequence giving the numbering , so that all my corresponding doubts will be cleared.

Thank you ,
Mayur Wankhade.

ANSWER: Dear Mayur,


For No appeal made scenario :

1) So when 3 minutes time has elapsed, and umpires considers that the delay is too much then to investigate the cause of such delay they will leave the ground calling "TIME" , and since TIME has been called any appeal made after that will not be valid, RIGHT ?

The new batsman or the other batsman should have been ready to take the striker, before 3 minutes are elapsed from the time of the last wicket falls. If no new batsman is appeared, the fielding side will have to appeal to the concerned umpire, who will note down the time of appeal and will meet his colleague to confirm the time of appeal. As this is one of the joint decisions, the umpires will be required to visit the pavilion to know who is the next batsman to enable them to declare him out 'Timed out". So only after appeal, the umpires will call Time and will visit the pavilion. Further appeal only will be made once the play restarts, otherwise, the scenario will be different and it will be considered as "Refusal to play" and the awarding the match to the fielding side.

In the umpires consider that an action by any player or players might constitute a refusal by either side, then they will after agreeing with each other, consult both the captains and will inform them the repercussions of not continuing play and if the situation persists, the umpires shall award the match to the other side. Here no appeal is required only umpires feel that there is protracted delay in the game, they will act accordingly.

2) so in this case if the reason for cause of delay is acceptable then we will add this investigation time to end of days play and no batsmen will be TIMED OUT since appeal was not made within its time limit (i.e before calling TIME by bowler's end umpire) , RIGHT ?

Yes, there is no need for umpires to wait for appeal in the above case. But after agreeing to resume and the umpires feel that there is a considerable time lost,and the actions of either side was unintentional, they will adjust the lost time before the end of the day's play. The Investigation time here will be considered from the initial action (i.e. from the call of "Time:) of the umpires till the "play" is called.


For appeal made scenario :

1) In this case if the after the elapse of 3 min of time ( and no batsmen appear on field), fielding side made an appeal then umpire will cross check with each other that 3 min time has elapsed or not , if elapsed they will consider the appeal , RIGHT ?

•   There must be an appeal to dismiss the next batsman, taking longer than 3 minutes.

•   Both Umpires should note down the time of fall of last wicket. In fact the timing of each batsman’s dismissal should be noted accurately by both the umpires so that when situation arises they must be ready to decide on “Timed out” dismissal. When there is an appeal they must check and ascertain the time of fall of a last wicket. The bowler’s end umpire will then give the incoming batsman out “Timed out”and will again note down the time of the fall of this wicket. 3 minutes for a new batsman to take striker starts immediately from this time.

•   A batsman cannot be given out, unless he enters the field of play, unless “Time”has been called. The umpire must thereafter ensure that the next batsman is on the field of play when giving the decision out. He must wait if necessary until the next batsman steps onto the field of play.



2) now taking into mind that appeal is valid and 3 min time has elapsed, so appeal must have to answer irrespective of any investigation , RIGHT ? ( I mean why batsman got delay , he slides down the pavilion stairs or get it difficult to come on field due to other acceptable reasons)


•   Umpires cannot wait for too long, if a new batsman does not appear at all. This action may be considered as refusing to play. The ball has become dead since the fall of last wicket and is in the custody of one of the concerned umpires. Now before leaving gthe ground, the concerned umpire shall call “Time” before proceeding to the pavilion, as the prolonged delay is to be considered as an interruption. This interruption time starts after 3 minutes have been elapsed.

•   Even though a new batsman is out, he cannot be dismissed. The umpire sole concern will be whether there has been a refusal to play or not.


Umpires will have to consider the following two different situations:

[1} Discover the cause of play

      If actions considered as refusal, warn the captain
      If actions persist, award the match to the fielding side
      Otherwise play continues.

{2} If actions not considered a refusal
     
      Set a time for play to resume
     Jointly calculate lost time, from the expiry of 3 minutes until “Play”  resumes,         
     close of play on that day to be put back by that length of time

     Inform the scorers.

If appeal is made it must be answered. In an addition to a possible refusal of play, a batsman is out and will be dismissed, whether play continues or not. The umpire will so inform the batting side captain. The captain will decide which batsman is to be given out,


Hope I have tried to clear your all doubts and this will satisfy your all queries. I will also get back to your other questions in a few days. Please bear with me for the delay.

With regards and best wishes
 


Suhas Sapre (Baroda 0506/2013)

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Respected Sir,

Thanks a lot for clearing my queries. And yes , i will wait for you to answer my other questions.
I would like to ask you that "How many times you have given any batsman timed out and how many times in your career you have awarded the match ?"

i guess this NO will be a single digit and probably below 5 only :)

thanks ,
Mayur Wankhade

Answer
Dear Mayur,

I appreciate your eagerness to know the facts regarding certain Laws. But there are many Laws which are not required to apply in cricket, but to avoid any controversy, they are parked and to be used in certain emergencies. Law:20 LOST BALL, is one of the Law. This has happened to me once in my whole career, when the played by the batsman lost withing the field of play in the local cricket tournament, and when batsmen completed 12 runs and when captain of the fielding side approached me and asked, Sir, what could be done, ball was not traceable. I had to intervene in the matter and just told him what to do. Then finally he declared "Lost ball". This happened because that was the fist match after monsoon and the mowing work work was not carried out in time. After all the fielding side retrieved the ball from within the field of play.

Awarding the match, would have happened once, but interference from officials, it had not happened. "Timed Out" has never happened to me, and in the history will tell you rest of the things regarding these particular Laws.

Provision of certain Laws are just there to take care of any emergency case.

Regards,


Suhas Sapre (Baroda 9/06/2013)

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I can help to give all questions regarding cricket laws, rules on both umpiring and cricket scoring. It will be a great pleasure to help any candidate who wants to clear the exam of BCCI. I can guide him how the questions are asked and the way they should be replied. I can also conduct classes for Cricket umpiring and scoring anywhere. I look forward to educate and promote local umpires in the days to come. I would help them to get through BCCI Level 1 exam.

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I have been a state panel cricket umpire and doing umpiring for last 40 years and also a BCCI official national scorer since 2004, having done many International ODIs played at Baroda and many first class matches in Baroda. I have passed many state panel exams in both categories.

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I was serving with State Bank of India, as an Officer, posted at Bodeli branch, some 65 Kmts from Baroda, having taken promotion in August 2012. I was thereafter transferred to Pavi Jepur Br, some 90 kmts from Baroda on 20/12/2013. Recently I have taken VRS from Bank as after becoming an officer I was facing lot of problems regarding leave to attend BCCI matches as a scorer and also Local umpiring and thus hampering my sporting activities. Now to enable me to spare more time for my passion, I have opted for VRS and was relieved on 30/01/2016 and now will look forward to enjoy my passion in the remaining years.Look forward to remain busy with cricketing activities for next one decade and more.Look forward to help my cricket colleagues. Look forward to give off my best services to my passion, which has taught me many more things and now I feel I must contribute towards the local cricket association, i.e. Baroda Cricket Association with all love and enthusiasm in the coming years.I feel proud to take VRS for the sake of my passion. Its a great feeling that I have taken a bold decision in the wake of my passion which has given me enjoyment and physical fitness to enjoy the game of cricket in the the days to come. Now I feel myself as a free bird and no tension. Look forward to help budding umpires.

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Earlier I used to write in local newspaper but thereafter time has not permitted me to do so. I give my views over the controversial topic.

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I am a degree holder of Commerce and having a reputed banking job in Baroda. Recently due to some personal problems and to fulfil my love and passion for the game of cricket I have opted volunteer retirement from the Bank service to enable me to do BCCI matches as an Official scorer in first class matches. Taking promotion in Bank and expecting leave for the matches was a major problem and that is one of the reasons to quit bank ahead of cricket.

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I have passed several examination of cricket umpiring at State levels. I passed Mumbai cricket Association as well as Baroda Cricket Associations state exams. I had also cleared national written test of BCCI, but unfortunately sheer bad luck in viva and practical. I have also stood first in the Scorers' state level examinations at Saurashtra, exam conducted by Saurashtra Cricket Association and also stood first in Mumbai Cricket Association's Scorers' exam. I further cleared the BCCI national exam in the year 1994 held at Ahmedabad. In all I have officiated as an Umpire in more than 3500 matches, including T20, ODI, 3-4-5/days matches, 6-aside, double wicket tournaments, single wicket tournaments, and many more festival events and charity matches. I have also officiated as an official scorer in many first class cricket matches as well as almost all ODI matches played at the IPCL/ Reliance Cricket ground in Baroda. In all I have officiated as an official scorer in not less than 300 matches. I have been appointed a Sports Secretary of SBI in Baroda (2010 to 2012) I have been elected as one of the Umpires' committee of Baroda Cricket Association on 23.04.2012 Looking forward to take care of local umpires and will try to educate them. Recently I was privileged to conduct a 3-day cricket Umpires seminar on 7 to 9 September, 2012 along with Shri Sanjay Hazare, BCCI Elite panel cricket umpire. This was my first ever experience to conduct a seminar, which had almost 60 participants. I am thankful to the Baroda Cricket Association for giving me this opportunity. I have been honoured on many occasions with awards and certificates for my best umpiring. Recently on 13th February, 2014, I was invited as a Chief Guest by Amrut School in Halol, to celebrate the Annual Sports Day of their school.

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