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Dog Training/How should dogs be trained?

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QUESTION: Hi again Barb.. thank you very much for your previous answer and advices...


Concern:

I have seen so many ways to train dogs but theres something I curious about that none of the articles mentioned

Can you train dogs several things at a time..
or should i train her one thing after another? like this below

start with number 1 then move to the next after few weeks or after she mastered it

1. getting her used to clicker as praise so she know she did good followed by a treat
2. calling by her name.. Call her by her name, if she moves towards me and look me in the eye click and give her treat
3. Using name to get her attention then followed by command like sit.


i also would like to know how do you really show your dog that you're the alpha? some article say you must always walk ahead of your dog enter through door and gates first. is that really true? I'd like to know because im having hard time doing it because my husky usually walks on front because its easier, i cant put my hand at back pulling her to the back so that she will be at my back when walking..

ANSWER: Yes, you can train a dog multiple skills at one time.  Dogs are always learning; use daily activities for opportunities to reinforce what you like with the clicker and treats. The clicker is a marker of behavior you like. The click is always followed by a treat.  Set the dog up to succeed. While she's learning, don't call her (or give another command/cue) if you're not sure she'll respond.  Your 1-2-3 is fine, but you don't have to wait until she masters each step.  Keep your training interesting for the dog.  Mix it up!

It's unrealistic to try and impose a rule like walking through doors first.  However, for safety reasons, dogs should always sit/stay before the front door opens.  That would be worthwhile to train.  

Your dog will learn you are a leader by understanding that you control all the "good stuff".  Don't give away food freely (don't leave food out all day), don't give attention on demand (make her do something for you first).  Reward polite behavior when she offers it.  You'll start to see more patient, polite behavior once you institute a work-to-earn program.  For reference, Google "Sophia Yin Learn to Earn".  

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: hi Barb, another followup question.. hope you dont mind. thanks again for all the info and advice you've given me

you said, "Set the dog up to succeed. While she's learning, don't call her (or give another command/cue) if you're not sure she'll respond."
that means if shes busy sniffing stuff and distracted i wait till shes done and only begin again when its likely she'll respond right? just want to confirm that i understood it correctly :)

also i have have problem with her getting too excited running outside. i think its because she doesnt have that much freedom right now cause all she have is a small space till i get home to get her out of it to get so we can have playtime and training. when were done and i need to do other things i need her to go back to her place and she doesnt want to. when she realize im going to put her back she sits still and shows good behavior. i know i cant put her in if shes being good but i need to.

Question: Is there a way to make her like staying there at a confined space where she mostly doesnt see anybody?

Right now i have 2 possible things that i think might solve it

1. when the kennel is done shell see more space and stuff to see outside tho she will still be confined.

2. when i get another dog she can play with maybe she wont be to lonely on being locked at her place

what do you think Barb?

Answer
You asked:  that means if shes busy sniffing stuff and distracted i wait till shes done and only begin again when its likely she'll respond right? just want to confirm that i understood it correctly :)

My response:  Exactly! Training new skills requires a minimum of distractions.

You asked:  Is there a way to make her like staying there at a confined space where she mostly doesnt see anybody?

My response:  Not really. Dog like to be with their people. Make the confinement area a place where she gets her food, chew toys and special treats. Be careful that you don't expose her to too much outside stimulation when she's confined.  It's best that the dog have a quiet place to eat and sleep.

I rarely recommend getting a second dog as a companion for your first.  Sometimes you end up wtih double trouble.  

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Barb Gadola, CPDT-KA, KPA CTP

Expertise

I can answer questions related to problem dog behaviors, teaching polite manners, puppy raising, and any type of training-related issues. My website page, www.DistinctiveDogTraining.com/resources offers a wealth of information on training and behavior issues as well.

Experience

I've been training dogs since 1989 and own and operate Distinctive Dog Training LLC in Keller TX. I specialize in providing practical and positive solutions for families through personalized training in their home.

Organizations
Karen Pryor Academy Certified Training Partner
Victoria Stilwell Positively! Licensed Trainer
Association of Pet Dog Trainers
Association of Animal Behavior Professionals
Truly Dog Friendly Coalition

Education/Credentials
BS in Education
Graduate work in Behavioral Psychology
Karen Pryor Academy Dog Training Program
Certified Professional Dog Trainer

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