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I own a female dog ( pomeranian spitz cross ).. She is 2 years and 8 months old ... We keep her in a cage when we go for work and in the evening we leave her free in our lawn ... When we leave her free from the cage she runs helter skelter and hits herself on all the furniture before going to the lawn.. Similarly, while bringing her back into the house in the night she runs wildly in the house and hits herself violently ( She doesnt fuss about it though ) ... She also runs around in circles ( in the same place ) ... This was not a problem till now ... We had bred her and she had conceived with 4 pups ( Got an ultrasound done on the 37th day ) ... But now on the 45th day, I could make out that her stomach was flat and hence I took her for an ultrasound again and the Vet said that the entire litter has got aborted ...This is a disaster ... The vet said that he could not ascertain the reason for the abortion as her hormone levels were fine ... So, I think that such a thing happened because she hits herself ( & her stomach so badly ) ... She is not trained but is not completely disobedient, so I thought of training her now itself so that this doesnt recur again ... Could you guide me how I am to go about with the
training ???

Answer

Hi Pranesh,

I'm sorry to hear that your dog has lost her litter.

I doubt that running into things made your dog lose her littler. The puppies are really well protected while inside their mother's body. Your dog might not be seeing as well as you think she is, if she runs into things. But if you know your dog has a habit of running into things (for whatever the reason), you shouldn't allow her to run off of a leash, or run in an area where she's in danger of hitting things. Dogs are quite stoic about showing pain (it's a survival skill), so she could be sore, depending on what she's running into, and how hard she hits it, just as you would. Knowing she could hurt herself by running into things, you shouldn't allow her to run.

To know with certainty why your dog aborted the litter, your vet would have to had examined the discharge under a microscope. I can only offer you guesses as to why she lost her litter. For starters, it's possible that your dog lacked the nutrition to carry and give birth to strong pups. Genetic or developmental defects can cause miscarriage. It's also possible that the pups were diseased, Brucellosis is one disease which could cause the loss of a litter, but there are others. If your dog lost the litter due to Brucellosis she should not be bred again (the male you bred your dog to should also be checked for Brucellosis and good health before being bred). A fungal infection in the uterus, or the parasite Neospora Caninum  spread in contaminated water, food, feces or infected meat could also cause a miscarriage.

You didn't say if your dog was examined and had blood work done prior to breeding her. If you have plans on breeding her again, you should be sure to have your vet examine her first. Some bacterial infections won't show up in bloodwork, so a titer test may be done to check if your dog was exposed. Healthy dogs are less likely to experience problems during pregnancy. If you breed your dog again, avoid exposure to disease. Keep your dog away from other dogs for three weeks before and three weeks after she gives birth. Lastly, sometimes miscarriages just happen, it's the same with people, there is not just an explanation for it. It's difficult to accept the fact that puppies can, and do die.
You can read more about pregnancy miscarriages in dogs here:

http://www.petwave.com/Dogs/Dog-Health-Center/Reproductive-Disorders/Abortion.as

http://www.petplace.com/dogs/spontaneous-abortion-in-the-dog/page1.aspx

You can't blame your dog or be mad at her for being disobedient if you've never trained her. She doesn't know that she's doing anything wrong! It's going to be more difficult to train a dog that's over 2 years old, if you've never trained a dog before. Just reading about how to do it isn't going to be nearly as quick or successful as working with an experienced dog trainer. A dog trainer will show you what you're doing wrong, and how to correct problems. Your vet's office might be able to give you a referral to a dog trainer.
That said, here are some sites to visit where you can read up on training a dog:

http://www.petfinder.com/dogs/dog-training/teaching-dog-come-called

http://www.thedogtrainingsecret.com/blog/teaching-dog-called-matter

http://www.cesarsway.com/tips/yournewdog/teaching-sit

http://www.articlesbase.com/pets-articles/training-your-dog-to-sit-and-stay-2071

You need to work on training your dog a couple of times a day, and it could take a few weeks before you see improvement. Never get mad at your dog, or punish her, besides not having a clue as to what's upsetting you, dogs learn through praise and reward, not by yelling or punishment. Always praise or reward whenever your dog does as you want her to do.

I hope I've been a help.
Best of luck,

Patti

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Patti

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To date, I've owned 7 dogs, all of which have lived into old age. Having cared for them in all stages of life, I feel I can offer sound advice to other pet owners, and people considering getting a dog. I am knowledgeable about the AKC (American Kennel Club) dog breeds, training and exercise, caring for sick and elderly pets, feeding, as well as many holistic treatments pets can benefit from. My only request is that you write me using standard English and punctuation.

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My life experience in this field is more like "on the job training" rather than an actual degree in animal welfare. You may benefit from my experiences over the past 30 years. Aside from the dogs I've owned, I'm also involved in "breed rescue" and have fostered several dogs, all of which have been adopted to wonderful "forever homes". I find helping people who want a dog very rewarding.

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Real life experience, based on over 30 years of dog ownership.

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