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Question
my dog wont stop barking at the people passing by the fence, as he is big and he has a lot of fur we dont keep him in the house, so we dont have anywhere else to put him but our backyard. what can i do?
( we got him 2 months ago from a dog shelter, they had him for 9 months, as his previous owner didnt take care of him. otherwise my dog is very friendly to people and is a quite quick learner especially if you give him treats)

Answer
Kaja,

Thanks for the question and thanks for getting a shelter dog and saving a life ;-)

 Barking is something that dogs do for several reasons. He is protecting his yard and his family. He is so grateful you adopted him and he is going to make sure nobody comes in his yard.

Positive reinforcement- When he starts barking call his name loudly and if he stops reward him with a snack and make a big deal of it. You could even say "good boy for not barking"  The average dog can understand thins on a 1st grade level and can also understand over 300 words. You can even go up to him while he is barking and call loudly STOP. Always reward and give positive reinforcement.

Do not try the shock collars they are really cruel.


I found some good idea's on a web site and I will post them below. Best of luck and if you still have problems e-mail me and I will dig a lil deeper for ya. It's a lot to read but its really good





Here's a list of six techniques that can help stop your dog from barking. While all of them can be very successful, you shouldn't expect miraculous results overnight. The longer your dog has been practicing the barking behavior, the longer it will take for him to change his ways.

Some of these training techniques require you to have an idea as to why your dog barks. We can help you get some insight into what is behind the bark.

Always remember to keep these tips in mind while training:
Don't yell at your dog to be quiet—it just sounds like you're barking along with him.
Keep your training sessions positive and upbeat.
Be consistent so you don't confuse your dog. Everyone in your family must apply the training methods every time your dog barks inappropriately. You can't let your dog get away with inappropriate barking some times and not others.

1. Remove the motivation

Your dog gets some kind of reward when he barks. Otherwise, he wouldn't do it. Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don't give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Example: barking at passersby
If he barks at people or animals passing by the living room window, manage his behavior by closing the curtains or putting your dog in another room.
If he barks at passersby when he's in the yard, bring him into the house. Never leave your dog outside unsupervised all day and night.

2. Ignore the barking

Ignore your dog's barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don't give him any attention at all while he's barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don't talk to him, don't touch him, and don't even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat.

To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. If he barks for an hour and you finally get so frustrated that you yell at him to be quiet, the next time he'll probably bark for an hour and a half. He learns that if he just barks long enough you'll give him attention.

Example: barking when confined
When you put your dog in his crate or in a gated room, turn your back and ignore him.
Once he stops barking, turn around, praise him, and give him a treat.
As he catches on that being quiet gets him a treat, lengthen the amount of time he must remain quiet before being rewarded.
Remember to start small by rewarding him for being quiet for just a few seconds, then working up to longer periods of quiet.
Keep it fun by varying the amount of time. Sometimes reward him after 5 seconds, then 12 seconds, then 3 seconds, then 20 seconds, and so on.

3. Desensitize your dog to the stimulus

Gradually get your dog accustomed to whatever is causing him to bark. Start with the stimulus (the thing that makes him bark) at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn't bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things (treats!).

Example: barking at dogs
Have a friend with a dog stand out of sight or far enough away so your dog won't bark at the other dog.
As your friend and her dog come into view, start feeding your dog lots of very yummy treats.
Stop feeding treats as soon as your friend and her dog disappear from view.
Repeat the process multiple times
Remember not to try to progress too quickly as it may take days or weeks before your dog can pay attention to you and the treats without barking at the other dog.

4. Teach your dog the "quiet" command

It may sound nonsensical, but the first step of this technique is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to "speak," wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say "speak."

Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the "quiet" command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to "speak." When he starts barking, say "quiet" and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

Example: someone at the door
When the doorbell rings, your dog alerts you to the presence of an "intruder" by barking wildly.
Once you've taught your dog the "quiet" command in a calm environment, practice in increasingly distracting situations until your dog can immediately stop barking when asked to, even when that "intruder" arrives at the door.

5. Ask your dog for an incompatible behavior

When your dog starts barking, ask him to do something that's incompatible with barking. Teaching your dog to react to barking stimuli with something that inhibits him from barking, such as lying down in his bed.

Example: someone at the door
Toss a treat on his mat and tell him to "go to your place."
When he's reliably going to his mat to earn a treat, up the ante by opening the door while he's on his mat. If he gets up, close the door immediately.
Repeat until he stays on his mat while the door opens.
Then increase the difficulty by having someone ring the doorbell while your dog is on his mat. Reward him if he stays in place.

6. Keep your dog tired

Make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.
   

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Any questions about caring for your puppy up to your older dogs. How to crate train your dog. the best food for your dog,Questions about the breed.If i can not answer your question i will point you in the right direction.

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