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QUESTION: My female cheweenie is on day 52 of her pregnancy. During the last couple of days I have started noticing her breathing faster not panting just more labored, and today I took her temperature and it was 99.5 .   I have been watching for any and all the signs, like lack of eating, nesting, restlessness, and there are none. I am wondering do all dogs have the 100 to 101 or could she actually be normal at 99.5.   Thank you in advance for anything you could add  to help me out.
Holli

ANSWER:
Hi Holli,

You probably have about ten days until your dog has her litter. Some dogs go a week longer than the average of 63 days, especially if it's her first pregnancy. Some dogs go into labor at 58 days after conception.

The raise in temperature 12 to 24 hours before giving birth isn't a rule that's cast in stone. Most dogs experience this, so it's a good rule of thumb, but your dog might not be aware of this "rule", and may not have the temperature change.  That said, you should start taking your dog's temperature mornings and evenings at day 56, and a record it.

Many dogs will have an increase in temperature right before it drops. Any temperature recorded lower than 98.4 indicates labor should begin within 24 hours. If your dog goes beyond 24 hours and labour has not begun, call your veterinarian.

You might find these sites helpful:

http://www.marvistavet.com/html/body_giving_birth_to_puppies.html

http://www.debbiejensen.com/temp_chart.html


Best of luck to you and your dog!

Patti


---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you Patti for responding so quickly.  It might help if someone would point out how to take the temperature correctly. ( I even U tubed it) I think when I tried to do it on my own i made an error. When my spouse got home we did it again and this time she was at 100.1  with that said I have been reading so much on  whelping and nothing told me to start taking her temp at any specific day so I didn't know.  She has been loosing her mucus plug a little at a time and I am very aware of her behavior as I am home with her all day.  I am worried that she doesn't seem to be nesting at all. Is there anything I can do to help her. I have tried placing her in the whelping box and she is not interested. I was wondering if I put it way back in my closet where it would be dark and private if this would help?  Oh and will the puppies stop moving as much as the time draws near? This is Tootsiii's first litter and mine as well and I'm not sure who is more nervous her or I.
Thanks again in advance for responding in a positive manner. I've been so afraid to ask questions as the backlash is very negative to those of us who simply found themselves in a situation that wasn't planned and now is enevitable.
Holli

ANSWER:
Hi Holli,

You don't need to be afraid to ask your questions, even though this pregnancy may not have been a planned event, you need to be prepared. That said, when Tootsiii has weaned her litter in about 5 weeks after the birth, you should consider getting her spayed so there isn't a repeat performance. It's not healthy for a dog to have consecutive litters.

I think one of the links I sent in my earlier response had a video embedded in it on how to take a dog's temperature. Here is another video on the subject:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fgwx2h6jjh8

Your dog may not yet be nesting because she isn't ready to give birth. As her pregnancy progresses to the birth, her behavior will change. There's really nothing to be done to make her nest until she feels the urge to do so.

As far as putting the whelping box in your closet, the whelping box is essentially the place where Tootsiii will deliver her puppies and will raise them for approximately the first six weeks of their lives. Your closet may not fit that bill. The box should be away from activity, noise, and other pets. It's good you put your dog in the whelping box even though she appears uninterested at the moment. She just needs to be familiar with it at this point. The area where the whelping box is kept kept in a warm (a consistent 75 degrees for the first few days following the birth.) If you don't have a space that's that warm, read up on the proper use of heating lamps or heating pads in a whelping box. Puppies can not regulate their own body heat and getting cold could be a death sentence for them.

Here is some more info on getting through the birth process:

http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?c=2+2109&aid=930

I hope I've been a help!
Patti

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

My newest additions
My newest additions  
QUESTION: Thank you Patti for all ur help. Since I was worried about the babies I took them to my vet and it was a hood thing I did as one of them was in the birth canal already. The vet determined we had a big litter and thought it best to do a C section .. While she was in there I had her fixed. I am happy to say I am a grand puppie mom. There were 6 at birth and the runt did not make it but it could have been worse as the others may have lost their lives as well had I not taken her to the vet. Again thank you for ur kindness and informative info it was very helpful. The vet was impressed with my knowledge, and the steps I had taken all the way to her delivery.
Thanks again,
Holli

Answer

Hi Holli,

I was thinking about you, and hoping that by not hearing back things were going well. In the end, all's well that ends well, though it's sad about the one baby that didn't make it, I'm glad your momma dog and the rest of the litter are doing well.

Thank you for sending the picture of the babies! You're sure to be a great puppy grandma.

Regards,
Patti

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Patti

Expertise

To date, I've owned 7 dogs, all of which have lived into old age. Having cared for them in all stages of life, I feel I can offer sound advice to other pet owners, and people considering getting a dog. I am knowledgeable about the AKC (American Kennel Club) dog breeds, training and exercise, caring for sick and elderly pets, feeding, as well as many holistic treatments pets can benefit from. My only request is that you write me using standard English and punctuation.

Experience

My life experience in this field is more like "on the job training" rather than an actual degree in animal welfare. You may benefit from my experiences over the past 30 years. Aside from the dogs I've owned, I'm also involved in "breed rescue" and have fostered several dogs, all of which have been adopted to wonderful "forever homes". I find helping people who want a dog very rewarding.

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Real life experience, based on over 30 years of dog ownership.

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