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Electric Motors/Wiring a GE blower motor

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Hi Will,

I bought an used GE motor off of somebody on Craigslist. Before I bought it, he tested it in front of me and it worked. However, I lost the wiring diagram he was nice enough to sketch me. The motor itself has 3 wires:
green
black
brown
While I do not have the wiring diagram, the gentleman had written the following on a piece of tape:
white & black = Hi
white & green = Low
The specs on the motor are as follows:
A: 3.9/8.2
Volts:115
HP:1/6  /  1/2
SFA: 4.6/9.1
MOD: 5KC45PG354X

From what I can tell, there is no capacitor or mount for one. The motor is very clean, so I am unsure how old it is. I have two questions:

How would I wire it to a simple 3 prong cord?
The the setup above mean that there is no ground and if so, hold would I ground it?

Thank,

Mike

Answer
Mike you have a two speed dual horsepower, dual speed motor,   the can on the top is the capacitor can, the capacitor is under it,    the connections he wrote are probably from the motor itself,   while you say the motor has different colors than he wrote down,  basically what could and is most likely is the wires to the motor are different in color than the Actual motor connections,   basically you should have a common   white,    one side of line,     dependent on the speed you want,   high or low,  you would put either black on the other side of line,  or green on the other side of line,  white stays on line all the time,       

To wire to a straight plug,  you have to pick a speed,    or you need a double pole double throw, center off switch  to have speed control,       

It appears he or someone has used a three wire piece of wire,   the green on a line is not a good thing,     but it is a wire and can be used for anything,    but green should be chassis ground only     however some people find a piece of wire  that has a green in the sheath and use it as a power lead,  which is fine,  it will conduct  but creates confusion,      


By the way he wrote things down, somewhere is  white,  a black and a green,

White should be COMMON        then pick one of the two speed leads,  for either 1800 or 1200      so you need to find the MOTOR COMMON>    that gets one side of your 110 line,   and then there should be two more choices for the other side of line,    one will give you high speed, the other the lower speed, but I see right now the cross referencing of colors may be an issue,         

Always use green for the chassis ground back to the off/  on switch all the way back to the earth ground bar in the main supply,     that leaves you two wires,   one hot one neutral,  and more confusing is of those two wires supplying the motor, one will always go to white common,   the other will go to one of the speed leads,  depending on what speed you want the blower to run,         

I hate it when this happens,    it is almost impossible to explain   but bottom line is you have a conversion of the colors of the wires,       

I imagine the colors with the green are sticking out of the motor,     

here is my personal email    faster than going through allexperts,  but no slam against them,  just that we may need to communicate a couple times to get you fixed up,        

Basically when done, if you want just one speed, and it is important what speed you choose,  these kinds of motors are often found on say a furnace blower,  the low for heat, the high for AC<       so I need to know what the application is also, not enough speed could create a problem and too much speed with not enough restriction could cause another problem,  so what are we blowing   ???

When we are all done  we will have regular old 110 or 115  two wires,  one to motor common,  one to one of the speed choices,    forget colors,   just look at it this way,   

Common    one side of line,   one of the other two speed choices to the other side,   and green or chassis ground,  is simply a frame ground as described above,    

but again some use green as POWER   and not a good idea,   it just causes confusion,  so we will have to look in the connection board, and see what the stem of wire hanging out connects too,    it appears this came off a furnace and ac unit,  and someone manually changed speeds at each season,  low for heat,  high for ac,          

my personal email is wbwill@sbcglobal.net     on the motor should be a cover plate,  with two screws,   I dont see the connection diagram on the main plate,  so it is probably on the underside of the plate,       from there  we will pick a speed,   put one side of 110 to common,   and dependent on the speed you want or need, the other side to the other speed terminal which corresponds to the speed you want     THEN EARTH GROUND IS JUST A WIRE THAT CONNECTS to the ground screw AND  goes from that ground on the chassis of the motor through any switches, starters or just right to the ground strip in the main box,    

but we have that green in there,  confusing things,        

Look under the cover and see if there is not a connection diagram there and let me know what it is,          we will go from there,  

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Will

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Three phase/ AC DC single phase motors, controls, any problems or failures, motor installation, performance issues, connections. All other electric motors/gearboxes/apparatus. Specialty repair concerns, obsolete motors and solutions. Other mechanical or specialty equipment. See my profile under Home/electrical at this site

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30 plus years in the electrical motor and apparatus repair industry. VP level management of repair facilities, current owner of my own specialty repair and consulting firm.

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EASA, IBEW [retired], other specialty organizations, Lubrication, Vibration EDI, Tribo-electric Councils

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Currently fielding concerns at this site under "Home Electrical"

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4 year technical, College level specific courses, EASA repair courses, vibration analysis electronic and electrical trade school.

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