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Electric Motors/How do I wire up a single-phase electric blower motor

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QUESTION: Hi there, I'm in Hong Kong (British setup 220-240V @  50Hz) and I've bought an Elctro ADDA single-phase .75kW, single-phase blower motor to drive a cyclonic dust separator that I've built. But how to wire it up? I thought it would be a piece of cake, but when I popped the case off the motor the diagram confused me: Z2, U2, V2, Cr...? What happened to line and neutral???  

I've attached photos of the wiring diagram from the motor case and of the motor circuits terminals. Perhaps you would be so good as to explain the whacky symbols and how to get a line and neutral in there with a switch--if I'm reading it correctly it's already set up to spin clockwise so we're good there.

Very much appreciated if you can help.

ANSWER: Patrick,   that is pretty awful isn't it? I am going to charge double for this.   OK you have a permanent split capacitor motor,    split capacitor motors  are wired like this,   one start on one side of the capacitor,  by itself,       a run winding and the other start on the OTHER SIDE OF THE CAPACITOR WITH A LINE    [neutral or hot for 110 volt low, no matter]

that leaves one more start lead and one more run lead, [common]     those are given the second line,  [again in US single phase line and neutral it don't matter which]

What the hell they are doing here is hard to figure,   what is the rated voltage for this motor?

It looks like the incoming lines go to the shunted  terminals     then they are somehow swapping the starts to get the motor to reverse,    so it could be that because the motor is ENGLISH   the lines are going to shunts  because of the two hots needed for 220 standard ENGLISH voltage,    

It looks to me that the voltage symbol is where you put the voltage,    then the sleeve of wires go to a capacitor,      then to again,  allow user to reverse swapping the UI and U2 [simply moving U1 to where U2 was and U2 to where U1 was]


 This is not typical for what they call IEC motors,[its standard for PSC motors but all this terminal board stuff is confusing,  

 non US International Electric Code or Connections,  I can never keep it straight,      In the US we use voltages for three phase  220-440,  and single phase [the line and neutral you were asking about]

However, only 110 volts or 120 or LOW VOLTAGE SINGLE PHASE is line to Neutral,     even in the US a 220 volt, 240 volt,  [the SAME THING 220/240]  Manufactures have slowly raised the voltage tolerances on US motors, because of the demand for power, many utilities supply 220 plus volts to avoid voltage drops as more and more electrical demand is adding on everyday.

220 volts does require two hots legs, ENGLISH three phase is 240-380  using mostly 6 lead single motors, for THREE PHASE   by not using 9 leads to give and exact paralleling of the windings,  so it is either double or half,     220-440   110-220  so on,    


 US uses either half or double voltage ratings with 9 leads,    the IEC insanity is based on a Y connection or a Delta external connection with only 6 leads,     but if that motor is rated 240 volts, 220 volts single phase, in ENGLAND the household outlet voltage is 220 or around there,    


Regardless   if this motor is 240 rated it needs two hots     to each of the two lines,  be it in the US or wherever,      and that is ALL that matters,      the motor wants @40 volts and doesn't care how you get it there,   

Motors are dumb animals   and as far as CURRENT goes,  the only thing that makes a difference is the frequency or HERTZ     60 in the US    50 England,    when you put a 50 cycle motor on a 60 cycle line   the THE opposite is this way   a 60 cycle rated motor, is going to run slower on 50 cycle

I believe in Hong Kong they use the same thing as ENGLAND,  so the 50 cycle motor will see 50 cycle and run at the rated nameplate speed and amps,    

Now to the wiring,       your motor is reversible,   see the arrow on each diagram?

That means wire it one way for CW rotation, and the other way for CCW rotation facing the shaft.  So be sure you know which way you want the shaft to turn before doing anything,

Then check the voltage, what are the voltage ratings on the motor?

The voltage symbol indicates the nameplate voltage goes on the shunted connections,   again swap the Us for rotation,   the cap symbol looks more like a contactor  than a capacitor, and then the one terminal stud has no nut or washer and appears to be xed off the diagram,,,

As most three phase IEC is 6 leads three phase, I bet they used the three phase terminal board to keep from making a single phase terminal board,   

It is not normal for me to see a shunt on single phase done this way  but according to the diagram that is how it goes,     voltage cannot come the other way       so it about has to be the Zs are start windings,     but check the voltage and maybe write me back on my personal email and verify the voltage,        other than that follow the directions as they are,         

---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Many thanks for your response, Will. I did wonder whether they had used a three-phase board--I suspect you're right there.

But I'm still unsure from your response as to where the wires go. I have 220/240V at 50Hz coming in (brown/live and blue/neutral cable on right of picture) and I need to know which posts to connect them to.

Just to clarify, the blue and yellow wires on the left of the photo head to the capacitor and this is a single-phase, 220/240V 0.75kW motor.

What I'm really after is this: where does the the brown live wire go and where does the blue neutral wire go?

Thanks so much for your help, Will.

Answer
you GET IT GOING??????????      tHANKS FOR THE KIND WORDS BUT IF IT AINT RUNNING I AM THE PROBLEM,    THAT WAS ONE OF THE MOST CONFUSING, YET SOMEWHAT UTILITARIAN USE OF EXISTING PARTS  I HAVE EVER SEEN,    I WAS STANDING ON MY HEAD,  BUT THE KEY IS HOW PSC MOTORS WORK  AND THEN WORK THE NUMBERS AND LETTERS ON THE LEADS BACKWARDS,  IT WILL WORK,      PLEASE LET ME KNOW IF YOU HAVE ONE BIT OF TROUBLE,       YOU HAD AN ALLSTAR QUESTION,     THAT MADE NO SENSE TO MANY      IT WAS CONFUSING  BUT I THOUGHT WELL MAYBE WE TAKE THE LEADS OFF,  AND GO THAT ROUTE   BUT WE NEEDED LIKE Y1 TO SHUNT THE RUN LEAD OVER TO THE CAP,      THEN IT WOULD HAVE GOT WORSE,   SO I LAID OFF THAT,   

IF ANYTHING GOES WRONG USE MY PERSONAL EMAIL  I DO NOT MIND,  AND IT IS MUCH SIMPLER,   I WILL CALL IF NEEDED         THANKS FRO THE KIND WORDS AGAIN,,,,,,,,,



http://symbols.radicasoftware.com/stencil/IEC2.html
U2 V1

The Zs have to be start winding ends,     because one Z is on the cap by itself,    all the time

Now that leaves the Us as the run winding ends     

To wire PSC motor you need a start lead on the cap by itself,   got that

Now we need a run and a line on the OTHER side of the CAP  [neutral or hot make no difference they are just 240 volts if you put a volt meter on them   

If you put line on the shunted terminals marked black, no matter what one of the run leads end up  on the other side of the cap with line

V2 is nothing,   V1 just accepts the shunt,  so if you swung the shunts horizontally or vertically  for rotation, you still end up with  a common  and  a run getting a line,    and on the cap        which is correct,   

And it leaves a run and start with a line     

WOW what a complicated way to do shit,    to prove my theory,  you could take the shunts off,  the higher resistance winding   [unplug cap]  is the start,   the lower resistance is the run,  

Some times they are exactly the same value    but not often   and it would not matter,    if you  remove the shunts,  there is nothing on the Vs,   underneath or anywhere, it is a three phase terminal board and they used the V post simply as a path for the shunted run lead and line,    that is what the black marks are for, they are trying to say  no matter how you swing the shunts according  to the diagram,  vertically or horizontally you still get just one run shunted through v terminal to the cap with line

Ive looked at this standing on my head and that has to be it,     it's funky but they used the three phase terminal and instead of three shunts just two,    and to make it easy  YEA RIGHT     they just allowed you to swing the shunts as shown  so both are black terminal to non black  either direction  horizontal or vertical  but one direction is vertically shunted and the other direction is horizontally shunted..

Reminds me of one of those damn mixed up posters you stare at long enough and see a dinosaur  

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Will

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Three phase/ AC DC single phase motors, controls, any problems or failures, motor installation, performance issues, connections. All other electric motors/gearboxes/apparatus. Specialty repair concerns, obsolete motors and solutions. Other mechanical or specialty equipment. See my profile under Home/electrical at this site

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30 plus years in the electrical motor and apparatus repair industry. VP level management of repair facilities, current owner of my own specialty repair and consulting firm.

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EASA, IBEW [retired], other specialty organizations, Lubrication, Vibration EDI, Tribo-electric Councils

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Currently fielding concerns at this site under "Home Electrical"

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4 year technical, College level specific courses, EASA repair courses, vibration analysis electronic and electrical trade school.

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