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Electrical Engineering/Subscript and Superscript Numbers.

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Dear Cleggsan

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subscript_and_superscript
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/superscript
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/subscript
http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/ref/Subscript.html
http://reference.wolfram.com/mathematica/ref/Superscript.html
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y1wSKpQEGQY
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_numbers
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_constant
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_constant


Do you feel the Subscript and Superscript can also be used accepting negative numbers, fractional numbers, decimal numbers, complex numbers, trigonometric values, logarithm, antilog, Unicode characters, alphanumeric, mathematical constant, physical constant  etc other than Whole numbers (Integers) in future applications viz Typography, Chemistry, Physics etc

Examples : -3, 2/3, 3.14, −3.5 + 2i, Sin 30, log 100, antilog 2, (Copyright sign), 3d, λ, G etc

i.e. Superscripts and Subscript accepting other numbers, characters, constants other than whole numbers.

Awaiting your reply,

Thanks & Regards,
Prashant S Akerkar

Answer
Of course.  They are used all the time in mathematic and engineering; however, as a student we  wish to stay away from them. In most case the numbers are integers because of their application.  For example adding a superscript to link to the bottom of the page is just for numbering in sequence.  In mathematics they are used to denote a special quantity or dimension and are mathematical operators.

In other words subscripts and superscripts are used in context and relate to the application.

http://www.rkm.com.au/calculators/CALCULATOR-powers.html

In the above calculator you can compute strange fractional exponents.

Try computing the number 10 raised to the 3.2 power.  You will get: 1584.893192461114

Here is a practical electronic circuit computation for charging a capacitor in an RC circuit.  See the solution to it where e is raised to a fractional power.

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20111204195343AAD3IZH

Hope this helps.  

Electrical Engineering

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