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Electrical Engineering/Anomalous Electricity Experiments?

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Question
QUESTION: Have you encountered these problems before? And What's going on?

Anomalous Electricity Experiments


Observations/Tests


A steel fork does not make spark when touch either side of a battery.

Connecting either side of a battery to a steel fork via wire does not make sparks.

Sparks occur when circuit stops being fully complete with enough voltage (about 2.7 volts) (2 AA NIMH).

(untested) Capacitor charges (only when circuit is near complete separated only by the gap between the plates)

Battery-provided electricity lights up an LED through a capacitor (all components in the same series circuit).
  
Battery doesn’t repel or attract steel silverware.

Battery-provided electricity lights up an LED through a capacitor (all components in the same series circuit).

Battery voltage decreases over time with use (not new).

Nickel-Metal Hydride battery self-recharges for a minute of use whenever it run out.

Multimeter results/measurements appear to defy entropy by going up. Putting the test lead wires next to each other seems to cause increase as well.

A battery terminal connected to a spoon-sized piece of metal creates an AC voltage of around 80-200 millivolts.

Still ceramic magnet touched by leads to a multimeter heavily affects the voltage up to 200 or more millivolts either direction.

Electric fan voltage defies Newton’s Third Law by only going down to 2.3V from 2.7V when it should perhaps go to zero.

Parallel circuit LED brightness defies explanation, stays the same even with at least 9 resistors all in their own circuits parallel to LED.

Conclusions

Electricity in a wire appears to be unrelated to charge.

Electrons only flow when circuit is complete or almost complete.

Since battery voltage decreases with use, the flow only occurs in one direction at a time when the battery is being used.

ANSWER: Whoa!  Way too many items on your list to respond to.  

Ohm's law always works.  Magnetic, electromagnetic and electrochemical effects all behave according to well known electrical principles.  

The question one may raise legitimately is what scientific and objective principle is being demonstrated by observations such as those you listed.

Let me know if you have some specific question.  Please avoid long lists of items as that takes an inordinate amount of time to discuss each one.



---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Dear cleggsan,

Do these experiments defy physics? Or are they all explainable currently? If they are explainable currently, then what is their cause, because I haven't had explanations anywhere for these?

Only 4 observations for now,
hopefully it's short enough to explain them or say they defy known laws:


Electric fan voltage defies Newton’s Third Law by only going down to 2.3V from 2.7V when it should perhaps go to zero.

Parallel circuit LED brightness defies explanation, stays the same even with at least 9 resistors all in their own circuits parallel to LED.

Battery-provided electricity lights up an LED through a capacitor (all components in the same series circuit).

A steel fork does not make spark when touch either side of a battery.
Connecting either side of a battery to a steel fork via wire does not make sparks.

ANSWER: Here are my comments:

Electric fan voltage defies Newton’s Third Law by only going down to 2.3V from 2.7V when it should perhaps go to zero.  

Comment: I would have to know the testing conditions and the circuitry of the fan's electric system.  There are many motors that increase in speed as voltage is reduced.  This observation is likely a misunderstanding of how to test and measure the true conditions.


Parallel circuit LED brightness defies explanation, stays the same even with at least 9 resistors all in their own circuits parallel to LED.

Comment:  Stupid misunderstanding of parallel circuitry.  Putting resistors in parallel with the LED does not change the voltage/current of the LED.  But it will when the load increases to the point of decreasing the voltage output of the power source.....

Battery-provided electricity lights up an LED through a capacitor (all components in the same series circuit).

Comment: I have no idea what circuit is being utilized but a capacitor can hold a charge large enough to illuminate an LED for a long time. Also, some capacitors have leakage current enough to power an LED,  especially the electrolytic type.....  


A steel fork does not make spark when touch either side of a battery.
Connecting either side of a battery to a steel fork via wire does not make sparks.

Comment: It's an ohm's law analysis.  The touching of object to complete a circuit across battery terminals experiences a sudden flow of current based on resistance and conductivity, capacitive and inductive parameters of the conducting material.  Electromagnetic radiation may occur, producing a visible spark, based on the electrical characteristics.  Further, the proximity of the human hands manipulating the conducting materials may have influence.

I suggest you take a first level course in basic electricity, ohm's law application, series and parallel circuits, ac circuits, physics of electricity, etc. and these looney "experiments" will become meaningless to you.

Have a great weekend.



---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you for the first substantial answer I've had after 4 months of asking websites these types of things!

Not everything makes sense with only my high/school/first-college-DC-class basic knowledge though, so, much of the answer, I can't understand.

Answer
Best to you in your studies.  Where you will learn that electronics and electrical engineering is a very exact study and the various laws of physics and electrical properties is observed precisely.  There is almost always a simple explanation for things which seem strange or don't fit the expectations of overly simplified observations.  When it gets to the micro and nano lever we do run into strange phenomenon but mostly because we haven't learned how to properly characterize the processes going on.

Hope this helps.  

Electrical Engineering

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cleggsan

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All technical areas of Electronics Engineering.

Experience

BSEE, MBA, Design, R&D, University Research.
Senior Life Member of IEEE. Life Fellow of AES.

Organizations
IEEE, Consumer Electronics Society, Audio Engineering Society.
Broad teaching experience; work experience mostly in consumer electronics and conversion from analog to digital technologies. Pioneer in digital audio at all levels.

Education/Credentials
BSEE (Equiv) BYU BSEE University of North Dakota MSBA (MBA) Illinois State University Graduate Studies in Computer Science - Bradley University Graduate Studies - Ohio University Graduate Studies - University of Missouri Kansas City DeVry Tech - Electronics

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