Electrical Engineering/Frequency Multiplier

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Question
Hi, I have a question about frequency multipliers. Why can frequency multipliers multiply to indefinite frequencies. Supposing you took an oscillator that generated 350 GHz. Why couldn't you use 30 frequency multipliers (which multiply a frequency by two) to ultimately create a 35Thz signal or even further?

Answer
Fourier math tells us the composition of a wave.  If the oscillator primary frequency is the strongest component of the frequencies then the odd and even harmonics are less in amplitude.  So, to multiply you must have a strong enough harmonic to latch on  to for the multiplier.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fourier_transform

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frequency_multiplier

The above will explain it in more technical terms.

Hope this helps.  

PS:  35Thz is pretty far up there.  I am not familiar with any conventional electronics that work that high up.

http://www.submm.caltech.edu/~goutam/ps_pdf_files/mont_02_imran.pdf  

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