English as a Second Language/sentences

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Question
1.The recent controversy over the safety of nuclear power plants in the region is unwarranted.
The staircase is narrow with a low ceiling, so you should walk up the stairs carefully.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I replace “unwarranted” with “unreasonable” or “unjustified”?
(2.)    In the first , what is the opposite of “unwarranted”? “Justified” or “reasonable”?

2. After a thorough examination, the doctor declared that he had food poisoning.
The politicians encouraged the public to overthrow the corrupt government.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)  In the first sentence, what is a good substitute for “declared”?  “Announced” or “confirmed”?
(2.) In the second, does it mean the same if I replace “encouraged” with “incited”?

3. The recent controversy over signing the trade agreement with China has triggered a series of student protests in Taiwan, known as the Sun Flower Movement.
  Ice preserves food from decay.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.) In the first sentence, what is a substitute for “sparked”? “Encouraged”?
(2.) In the second, does it mean the same if I say “Ice keeps food from going bad”?

4.
Each person’s interest in a joint account is deemed equal.
Two companies may form a joint venture to share the risks involved in the new enterprise.

(1.) What is another way to rephrase the first? “Both parties in a joint account have equal interest”? (or Can I say “…have an equal interest”?)
(2. ) In the second, what is a substitute for “the new enterprise”? “The new project”?


5. The power has corrupted the president and has changed him into an authoritarian leader who hardly listens to his people’s voice.
 Being able to rely on herself is of great importance to her.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “authoritarian leader”?
(2.)    In the second, does it mean the same if I say, “It is very important for her to be able to rely on herself”?

6. A good recommendation will assure you a better chance of getting into a good school.

Is the sentence grammatically correct?
(1.)    Does it mean the same if I leave out “you” in the sentence?
(2.)    Does it mean the same if I say, “A good recommendation will ensure a better chance of…” or “A good recommendation will guarantee a better chance of…”?

Answer
1.The recent controversy over the safety of nuclear power plants in the region is unwarranted.
The staircase is narrow with a low ceiling, so you should walk up the stairs carefully.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)   In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I replace “unwarranted” with “unreasonable” or “unjustified”? absolutely; unfounded also works
(2.)    In the first , what is the opposite of “unwarranted”? “Justified” or “reasonable”? correct again

2. After a thorough examination, the doctor declared that he had food poisoning.
The politicians encouraged the public to overthrow the corrupt government.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)  In the first sentence, what is a good substitute for “declared”?  “Announced” or “confirmed”? confirmed is the better choice here
(2.) In the second, does it mean the same if I replace “encouraged” with “incited”? yes

3. The recent controversy over signing the trade agreement with China has triggered a series of student protests in Taiwan, known as the Sun Flower Movement.
 Ice preserves food from decay.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes, but "from decaying"
(1.) In the first sentence, what is a substitute for “sparked”? “Encouraged”? I see no "sparked" in the first sentence?!
(2.) In the second, does it mean the same if I say “Ice keeps food from going bad”? yes

4.
Each person’s interest in a joint account is deemed equal.
Two companies may form a joint venture to share the risks involved in the new enterprise.

(1.) What is another way to rephrase the first? “Both parties in a joint account have equal interest”? You could say that but the original sentence expresses the idea much better.
or Can I say “…have an equal interest”? - no
(2. ) In the second, what is a substitute for “the new enterprise”? “The new project”? correct or "the new undertaking"


5. The power has corrupted the president and has changed him into an authoritarian leader who hardly listens to his people’s voice.
Being able to rely on herself is of great importance to her.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes, I'd say "people's voices" in the first
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “authoritarian leader”? dictator
(2.)    In the second, does it mean the same if I say, “It is very important for her to be able to rely on herself”? yes

6. A good recommendation will assure you a better chance of getting into a good school.

Is the sentence grammatically correct? No, you mean "ensure" not "assure"
assure - something you do to a person, a group of people, or an animal to remove doubt or anxiety
ensure - something you do to guarantee an event or condition
(1.)    Does it mean the same if I leave out “you” in the sentence? yes
(2.)    Does it mean the same if I say, “A good recommendation will ensure a better chance of…”  see above
or “A good recommendation will guarantee a better chance of…”? yes, this is correct


I hope this helps.

Feel free to follow up on # 3 to clarify that.

Best,  

English as a Second Language

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