English as a Second Language/sentences

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QUESTION: 1. Jean possesses characteristics such as beauty and intelligence.
The latest smartphones present many characteristics that appeal to young consumers.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?  
(1.)   In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “Jean is characterized by her beauty and intelligence”?
(2.)    In the second, does it mean the same if I say “..many characteristics that attract young consumers”?

2.   Although John and David are twin brothers, they have quite different characters.
We favor this project because it has characteristics of time saving and economical in cost.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I replace “characters” with “characteristics”? What is the difference?
(2.)    What is another way to say “economical in cost” in the second?

3.The bank has established/built a good reputation for its customer service.

This language school is a well-run establishment with a long history.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.) In the second, what is a substitute for “establishment”? “business “or “company”?

4.When I don’t know how to deal with a situation, Peter always helps me resolve my dilemma.
The labor union often helps resolve the differences between employers and employees.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   Can I replace “resolve” with “solve” in each of the two sentences above?

5.   Many people think that the rich should live more happily than the poor, but they all have their own issues to resolve.
Did my answer/explanation resolve your doubts about this matter?

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “…but they all have their own problems to solve”?
(2.)    Can I use the singular “doubt” in the second sentence?

6. Your question is too general. Please be as much specific as possible.
Where and when do you want to meet? Can you name a specific palace and time?

Are all the sentences above grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say,” Your question is too broad”?
(2.)    What could be a substitute for “name” in the second?

ANSWER: 1. Jean possesses characteristics such as beauty and intelligence.
The latest smartphones present many characteristics that appeal to young consumers.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?  Yes. In all honesty though I've probably never heard a native English speaker say something like your first sentence here. We say Jean is pretty/beautiful and intelligent.
(1.)   In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “Jean is characterized by her beauty and intelligence”? Yes, but again, it sounds awkward and pompous. Not something a native speaker would say.
(2.)    In the second, does it mean the same if I say “..many characteristics that attract young consumers”? Yes

2.   Although John and David are twin brothers, they have quite different characters.
We favor this project because it has characteristics of time saving and economical in cost.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes. (we prefer to simply say "twins" instead of twin brothers). I'd rephrase the second: We favor this project because it allows/will allow us to save time and money.
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I replace “characters” with “characteristics”? What is the difference? Character and characteristics can be synonyms, but most times when we say "character" we mean moral/ethical strength; characteristics are features that distinguish people/things from one another.
(2.)    What is another way to say “economical in cost” in the second? See my version of the sentence above.

3.The bank has established/built a good reputation for its customer service.
This language school is a well-run establishment with a long history.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.) In the second, what is a substitute for “establishment”? “business “or “company”? I'd say organization, or better yet institution in this case (we're talking about a school here)

4.When I don’t know how to deal with a situation, Peter always helps me resolve my dilemma.
The labor union often helps resolve the differences between employers and employees.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)   Can I replace “resolve” with “solve” in each of the two sentences above? Yes

5.   Many people think that the rich should live more happily than the poor, but they all have their own issues to resolve.
Did my answer/explanation resolve your doubts about this matter?

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “…but they all have their own problems to solve”? Yes
(2.)    Can I use the singular “doubt” in the second sentence? Yes

6. Your question is too general. Please be as much specific as possible.
Where and when do you want to meet? Can you name a specific palace and time?

Are all the sentences above grammatically correct? The second one isn't, It should read: please be as specific as possible. Also, in the fourth I assume you meant to write "place" not "palace"
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say,” Your question is too broad”? Yes, I'd stick to "general"
(2.)    What could be a substitute for “name” in the second? Choose or select can be used here, most people would probably use "name" here though.




---------- FOLLOW-UP ----------

QUESTION: Thank you for your help. I have a follow-up on question #1.

I have rewritten the first sentence to try to make my point better.

"Jean has/possesses characteristics that all other girls desire: beauty and intelligence."

"Jean has characteristics that attract all men: beauty and intelligence"


I wonder if I used the word "characteristic" properly in the sentences. Or would it sound better if I used "trait" or "quality"?

Answer
Oppo,

if you insist on rephrasing that sentence, please see below. The sentences above sound awkward to me. We don't say "Jean has characteristics/attributes/traits etc" we simply list those attributes and say "Jean IS pretty/smart/witty/charming etc." It's as if you'd say "My car has a black color" while the correct thing to say is "My car is black".

My versions of the two new sentences you've inquired about:

Jean is pretty and intelligent; qualities/attributes that all (other) girls desire.
Jean is pretty/beautiful and smart/intelligent; qualities/attributes that attract all men.

I hope this helps.

Best,  

English as a Second Language

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