English as a Second Language/sentences

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1.The candidate made/gave an eloquent speech to the audience in his election campaign.
  Be sure to address the envelope correctly, so the mail can reach the intended person.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I say also, “The candidate made an eloquent address in his election campaign” or “The candidate eloquently addressed the audience in his election campaign”?
(2.)    In the second, can I say also, “..so the mail can reach the proper person”?

2. The purpose of this conference is to address the issue of global warming.
The government is adopting several drastic measures to address the issue of unemployment.

 Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first, does it mean the same if I say “The purpose of this conference is to help solve global warming”?
(2.)    In the second, can I change “the issue” to “the concern”? What is the difference?

3. When in class, students are asked to demonstrate/display their English listening and reading skills.
The teachers’ union took to the streets in protest against joblessness.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I replace “skills” with “comprehension”?
(2.)    In the second, what is a substitute for “took to the streets” and “joblessness”? “demonstrated” and “unemployment”?

4. At the job interview, the university’s director asked Phoebe to give a teaching demonstration.
The chef shows his culinary skills to audiences at cooking demonstrations.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “..the university’s director had Phoebe demonstrate her teaching skills”?
(2.)    In the second, can I say “shows off” instead “shows”? What is the difference?

5. The company has developed rapidly and has become one of the fast-growing businesses in the country.
She has developed a good exercise routine by self-training and self-discipline.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the second sentence, what is another word “developed”? “formed”?
(2.)    In the second, can I change “routine” to “habit”?

6. Monica tries to develop good reading habits by finding something that she enjoys reading about.
Exercise can help develop the muscles and improve health.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the second, can I leave out “help” and just say “Exercise can develop the muscles and improve health”?

Answer
1.The candidate made/gave an eloquent speech to the audience in his election campaign.
 Be sure to address the envelope correctly, so the mail can reach the intended person.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes, in the second I'd say "so it can reach the intended person"
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I say also, “The candidate made an eloquent address in his election campaign” or “The candidate eloquently addressed the audience in his election campaign”? yes
(2.)    In the second, can I say also, “..so the mail can reach the proper person”? yes

2. The purpose of this conference is to address the issue of global warming.
The government is adopting several drastic measures to address the issue of unemployment.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)    In the first, does it mean the same if I say “The purpose of this conference is to help solve global warming”? no
(2.)    In the second, can I change “the issue” to “the concern”? What is the difference? you could but "issue" makes more sense for me here.

3. When in class, students are asked to demonstrate/display their English listening and reading skills.
The teachers’ union took to the streets in protest against joblessness.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I replace “skills” with “comprehension”? yes
(2.)    In the second, what is a substitute for “took to the streets” and “joblessness”? “demonstrated” and “unemployment”? yes, in fact "joblessness" is not a very common word. We use unemployment instead"

4. At the job interview, the university’s director asked Phoebe to give a teaching demonstration.
The chef shows his culinary skills to audiences at cooking demonstrations.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes, only we usually say "the director of the University"
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “..the university’s director had Phoebe demonstrate her teaching skills”? yes
(2.)    In the second, can I say “shows off” instead “shows”? What is the difference? No. To show means to demonstrate, to show off means to make a deliberate or pretentious display of one's abilities or accomplishments. Usually arrogant people show off.

5. The company has developed rapidly and has become one of the fast-growing businesses in the country.
She has developed a good exercise routine by self-training and self-discipline.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)    In the second sentence, what is another word “developed”? “formed”? no, grown or advanced.
(2.)    In the second, can I change “routine” to “habit”? no, we call it an "exercise routine"

6. Monica tries to develop good reading habits by finding something that she enjoys reading about.
Exercise can help develop the muscles and improve health.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)    In the second, can I leave out “help” and just say “Exercise can develop the muscles and improve health”? yes  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

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