English as a Second Language/Questions

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Question
Are these sentences correct?if not why?
I have taught Physics for 2 years but now I dont teach it.
I want to tell you a story that I have read during my univerity days.
I want to tell you a story that I read during my univerity days.
I want to tell you a story I have read in my uiversity textbook.

Do these two sentences mean the same?
I am eating the apple you gave to me.
I am eating the apple you have given to me.
sorry is it correct to write "eatting"?

Answer
Hi Nilo,

good to hear from you again.

I have taught Physics for 2 years but now I don't teach it. Correct

I want to tell you a story that I have read during my univerity days.
I want to tell you a story that I read during my univerity days.
I want to tell you a story I have read in my uiversity textbook.

A couple of things here: the correct spelling is "university". Also, we say "when I was a (university) student" or "when I attended university"; "during my university years" is not something a native English speaker would say.

Back to the three sentences above:

I want to tell you a story that I have read when I was a student. Incorrect
We use the Present Perfect to say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. The exact time is not important. You can't use the Present Perfect with specific time expressions such as: when I was a student.

I want to tell you a story that I read when I was a student. Correct

I want to tell you a story I have read in my university textbook. Correct

(even though, I'd rather say "in my English/History textbook"; "university textbook is not incorrect but may sound ambiguous to some)


Do these two sentences mean the same?
I am eating the apple you gave to me.
I am eating the apple you have given to me.

In the second part of the first sentence you use the Past Simple Tense. We use the Simple Past to express the idea that an action started and finished at a specific time in the past. Sometimes, the speaker may not actually mention the specific time, but they do have one specific time in mind.

In the second part of the second sentence you use the Present Perfect Tense. We use the Present Perfect to say that an action happened at an unspecified time before now. The exact time is not important.

To be perfectly honest, in this case, there really is no significant difference between the two sentences. The only thing that may make a difference is the fact that in the first sentence you have a particular time in mind when the person you're talking to gave you the apple, while in the second sentence this time doesn't really matter. Again, I'd consider the two sentences to have the same meaning.


sorry is it correct to write "eatting"? No, the correct spelling is "eating"

I hope this helps Nilo.

As always, a pleasure helping you. Feel free to continue sending me questions and I'll try my best to help.

Best regards,

Amy

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

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