English as a Second Language/Questions

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Question
Hello
Are there any differences between "cruise" and "cruise off"?

Are this sentences correct?
"My plan is a cruise to France."
"where are you cruising to?"
"He is going to cruise in jungle."
"He is going to take a cruise in this city."
"when do you want to cycle?"

Answer
Hello Nilo,


1. Are there any differences between "cruise" and "cruise off"?
I've never heard of "cruise off", in fact I doubt that is correct.

2. Are this sentences correct?

"My plan is a cruise to France." incorrect
"where are you cruising to?" it could be correct, but I need more context
"He is going to cruise in jungle." incorrect
"He is going to take a cruise in this city." incorrect
"when do you want to cycle?" could be correct but as I said before I need details about the context

For clarification purposes:
* a cruise (or a boat/sea trip) is a voyage on a ship or boat taken for pleasure or as a vacation and usually calling in at several places.
* to cruise means to sail about in an area without a precise destination, especially for pleasure; or it can also mean travel smoothly at a moderate or low speed

Also, "sentences" is a plural noun, so you can't say: this (singular) sentences (plural); the correct way to say it is: these (plural) sentences (plural) vs this (singular) sentence (singular)

I hope this helps Nilo.

Best,

Amy  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

Expertise

I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

Education/Credentials
BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

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