English as a Second Language/sentences

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Question
1.To some extent/degree, clothes may be useful to judge a person.
He has been struggling with cancer for many years and still has high hopes of recovery.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “On a certain level…”?
(2.)    In the first, can I say also, “clothes may be useful in judging a person”?

2.In my opinion, there are many advantages of speaking fluent English.
Discretion in speech is more important than eloquence.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I say, “…speaking fluent English has many advantages/benefits”?
(2.)   In the second, does it mean the same if I say, “Being careful about what you say is more important than being eloquent”?

3.In cities, drivers have to tolerate far more stop signs and speed limit restrictions than in the country.
John is good driver who always pays attention to traffic signs and never drives faster than speed limits.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I remove the word “in cities” and place it before “than”? “Drivers have to tolerate far more stop signs and speed limit restrictions in cities than in the country”?

4.He got the money by forging his father’s signature on a check.
She showed an independent spirit and disrespect for the male authority that dominated at the time.

(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say, “He took the money by forging…” or “He forged his father’s signature on a check to get the money”?
(2.)    In the second, what is a substitute for “dominated”?

5. People should remain optimistic toward life, especially when encountering difficulties.
The average monthly salary of an employee in Taiwan in July 1995 was NT $32,861.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it have the same meaning if I replace “encountering” with “facing” or “confronting”?
(2.)    In the second, should I leave out “of an employee”? Does it mean the same if I leave out?

6.  It's difficult for many inhabitants to put up with the increasing number of tourists disturbing their peaceful lifestyle.
   The incident had a strong impact on the residents and many of them still can’t get over what happened that day.


Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “Many inhabitants find it difficult to tolerate more and more tourists interrupting their peaceful lifestyle.”?

(2.) In the second, what is another way to say “can’t get over what happened that day”?

Answer
1.To some extent/degree, clothes may be useful to judge a person.
He has been struggling with cancer for many years and still has high hopes of recovery.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say, “On a certain level…”? Yes
(2.)    In the first, can I say also, “clothes may be useful in judging a person”? Yes

2.In my opinion, there are many advantages of speaking fluent English.
Discretion in speech is more important than eloquence.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes but "to speaking English"
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I say, “…speaking fluent English has many advantages/benefits”? Yes
(2.)   In the second, does it mean the same if I say, “Being careful about what you say is more important than being eloquent”? Yes

3.In cities, drivers have to tolerate far more stop signs and speed limit restrictions than in the country.
John is good driver who always pays attention to traffic signs and never drives faster than speed limits.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes, but "faster than the speed limit" in the second
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I remove the word “in cities” and place it before “than”? “Drivers have to tolerate far more stop signs and speed limit restrictions in cities than in the country”? Yes

4.He got the money by forging his father’s signature on a check.
She showed an independent spirit and disrespect for the male authority that dominated at the time.

(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say, “He took the money by forging…” or “He forged his father’s signature on a check to get the money”? Yes to the second, no to the first. "take" and "get" are not synonym
(2.)    In the second, what is a substitute for “dominated”? "was in charge/control"

5. People should remain optimistic toward life, especially when encountering difficulties.
The average monthly salary of an employee in Taiwan in July 1995 was NT $32,861.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it have the same meaning if I replace “encountering” with “facing” or “confronting”? Yes
(2.)    In the second, should I leave out “of an employee”? Does it mean the same if I leave out? You could leave it out, the meaning won't change

6.  It's difficult for many inhabitants to put up with the increasing number of tourists disturbing their peaceful lifestyle.
   The incident had a strong impact on the residents and many of them still can’t get over what happened that day.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes. I'd use "locals" instead of inhabitants.
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “Many inhabitants find it difficult to tolerate more and more tourists interrupting their peaceful lifestyle.”? Yes
(2.) In the second, what is another way to say “can’t get over what happened that day”? Have a hard time forgetting (what happened) that day or have a hard time forgetting (the events of) that day.  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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