English as a Second Language/sentences

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Question
1. When the company called Justin to offer him a job, he took it without hesitation because they would pay him a much higher salary than his previous company.
I didn’t buy anything when I was shopping in the shoe store because I am hesitant about the colors of those shoes.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the second, can I replace “hesitant” with “ambivalent” or “uncertain”?

2. He was appointed correspondent in DC to cover the news of the White House.
As a diplomat, he has been appointed to jobs in different countries.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is the difference if I say, “He was appointed to report the news of the White House in DC”?
(2.)    In the second, can I say also, “he has been appointed to work in different countries”?

3. I was appointed by my company to attend the meeting in Japan.
The company generated a great profit last year by reducing its costs.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “My company appointed me to the meeting in Japan” or “My company appointed me to attending the meeting in Japan”?

4.They utilize panels on their roof to generate electricity from the sun.
A power failure occurred in my apartment building due to a generator breakdown.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   In the second, can I say also, “due to the breakdown of the generator”?

5.I asked him for help, but he refused me.
I applied to about 20 companies but was rejected by most of them.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?

(1.)   In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say “rejected/declined me” or “turned me down”?
(2.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “He refused/rejected/declined to help me when I made a request” or “He refused/rejected/declined my request when I asked for help”?

6. John had a crush on Mandy, but he felt hesitant to ask her out because he was afraid of being rejected.
The murderer claimed that he was insane when he committed the crime, but the judge rejected his argument because the test results proved it wrong.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I say also “he was afraid of rejection”?
(2.)    In the second, what is another way to say “rejected his argument”?

7. I told the teacher that I was late because of traffic, but he rejected my excuse.

Is the sentence grammatically correct?

Answer
1. When the company called Justin to offer him a job, he took it without hesitation because they would pay him a much higher salary than his previous company.
I didn’t buy anything when I was shopping in the shoe store because I am hesitant about the colors of those shoes.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)    In the second, can I replace “hesitant” with “ambivalent” or “uncertain”? Yes, ambivalent is not a very good choice here since the context is informal.

2. He was appointed correspondent in DC to cover the news of the White House.
As a diplomat, he has been appointed to jobs in different countries.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? I'd say "He was THE appointed...the news AT/FROM the White House" The second needs rephrased too: "As a diplomat he held jobs in different countries."
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is the difference if I say, “He was appointed to report the news of the White House in DC”? It's not correct, just like the original sentence is incorrect
(2.)    In the second, can I say also, “he has been appointed to work in different countries”? See my version above

3. I was appointed by my company to attend the meeting in Japan.
The company generated a great profit last year by reducing its costs.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “My company appointed me to the meeting in Japan” or “My company appointed me to attending the meeting in Japan”? Yes

4.They utilize panels on their roof to generate electricity from the sun.
A power failure occurred in my apartment building due to a generator breakdown.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)   In the second, can I say also, “due to the breakdown of the generator”? Yes

5.I asked him for help, but he refused me.
I applied to about 20 companies but was rejected by most of them.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes

(1.)   In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I say “rejected/declined me” or “turned me down”? Rejected is ok, declined is also ok (no "me" though), turned me down is ok.
(2.)    In the first sentence, can I say also, “He refused/rejected/declined to help me when I made a request” or “He refused/rejected/declined my request when I asked for help”? Yes

6. John had a crush on Mandy, but he felt hesitant to ask her out because he was afraid of being rejected.
The murderer claimed that he was insane when he committed the crime, but the judge rejected his argument because the test results proved it wrong.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? Yes
(1.)   In the first sentence, can I say also “he was afraid of rejection”? Yes, the original sounds better though
(2.)    In the second, what is another way to say “rejected his argument”? Dismissed his claim/argument

7. I told the teacher that I was late because of traffic, but he rejected my excuse.

Is the sentence grammatically correct? Yes but "declined" works better than "rejected" here.  

English as a Second Language

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