English as a Second Language/sentences

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Question
1.How have you been? What have you been up to?

If you plan to take the exam, please submit your application within two weeks or at the latest, August 30th.

Are all the sentences grammatically correct?
(1.) What is another way to say “What you have been up to”?
(2.) In the second, can I say also, “..please submit your application soon or at the latest, August 30th”?


2. Mary’s been up to something wicked. She is planning to take Ann’s boyfriend away from her.
John just called and asked if I wanted to join him for a movie, but I am not up for it. I am too tired.

Are all the sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)   What is another way to say “take someone’s boyfriend away from her”?
(2.)    In the second, can I say also “I am not up to it”? What is the difference?

3.I worked in Chicago for about 7 years, took a few years off to travel and now I am back. In fact, I am interviewing Eagle Mountain next week. I got lucky-their West coast sales manager moved to Europe.

(1.)    In the text above, what does “took a few years off to travel” mean? “Moving to another city” or “traveling for fun”?
(2.)    Does the last sentence imply that the person got an interview because the company’s manger left and therefore there is an opening”?

4.
A: I sent my report as an attachment. Do you think you’ll have time to review it for me?
B: I can get to it this afternoon or at the latest, tomorrow morning.
A: That would be great. I’ am a little nervous about submitting it to management. You have been at this a lot longer than I have. Your help will be invaluable.

(1.)    In the conversation, can I change “as an attachment” to “with an attachment”? What is the difference?
(2.)    In the conversation, what is another way to say “I can get to it” and “you have been at this a lot longer..”?
(3.)    In the conversation, is it possible to rephrase B’s response like this: I can get to it tomorrow morning or at the earliest, this afternoon?

5. You can call Jerry and get the order going. He’d be a great resource.
I must tell you, with all due respect, that in 20 years in the business, I’ve never been told I couldn’t bring a client to an event.


(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “get the order going” and “be a great resource”?  “Process the order”?

(2.)    In the second, what does “due” mean or another way to say “with all due respect”?


6. When the hotel reaches capacity, tell people the event is too full.
  Since the profits have improved, we are all getting bonuses.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)  What is another way to say “the hotel reaches capacity”?

Answer
1.How have you been? What have you been up to?
If you plan to take the exam, please submit your application within two weeks or at the latest, August 30th.

Are all the sentences grammatically correct? yes but the first two question mean the same thing more or less.
(1.) What is another way to say “What you have been up to”? What's new? How are things going with you? How have you been?
(2.) In the second, can I say also, “..please submit your application soon or at the latest, August 30th”? I'd say "please submit your application by August 30th"

2. Mary’s been up to something wicked. She is planning to take Ann’s boyfriend away from her.
John just called and asked if I wanted to join him for a movie, but I am not up for it. I am too tired.

Are all the sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)   What is another way to say “take someone’s boyfriend away from her”? "steal her boyfriend"
(2.)    In the second, can I say also “I am not up to it”? What is the difference? To be up for something is an idiomatic expression meaning to be ready for something; "to be up to something" means to plan something bad; or if you ask "what are you up to" it means what are your plans; definitely not what you intend to say here.

3.I worked in Chicago for about 7 years, took a few years off to travel and now I am back. In fact, I am interviewing Eagle Mountain next week. I got lucky-their West coast sales manager moved to Europe.

(1.)    In the text above, what does “took a few years off to travel” mean? “Moving to another city” or “traveling for fun”? It simply means that the person spent a few years travelling; it doesn't imply moving to another city.
(2.)    Does the last sentence imply that the person got an interview because the company’s manger left and therefore there is an opening”? yes.

4.
A: I sent my report as an attachment. Do you think you’ll have time to review it for me?
B: I can get to it this afternoon or at the latest, tomorrow morning.
A: That would be great. I’ am a little nervous about submitting it to management. You have been at this a lot longer than I have. Your help will be invaluable.

(1.)    In the conversation, can I change “as an attachment” to “with an attachment”? What is the difference? no; the report is sent AS an attachment; to say "with an attachment" may be misinterpreted as - I sent you the report and there is an attachment that comes with it as well.
(2.)    In the conversation, what is another way to say “I can get to it” I can help you with it; I can take a look at it
and “you have been at this a lot longer..”? you've done this (job) for longer than I have
(3.)    In the conversation, is it possible to rephrase B’s response like this: I can get to it tomorrow morning or at the earliest, this afternoon? Yes; personally I prefer to list things in chronological order (earliest to latest), it makes more sense to me.

5. You can call Jerry and get the order going. He’d be a great resource.
I must tell you, with all due respect, that in 20 years in the business, I’ve never been told I couldn’t bring a client to an event.


(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “get the order going” and “be a great resource”?  “Process the order”? yes; and "be very knowledgeable" "be extremely resourceful" or anything along these lines

(2.)    In the second, what does “due” mean or another way to say “with all due respect”? Depending on the context "due" means that the person deserves to be treated/seen with respect. Also "with all due respect" is sometimes put at the beginning of a sentence when we are going to say something that the listener may be insulted by. It means, "I don't mean this to be an insult, but..." We often use it with people of a higher social or professional rank than ours.

6. When the hotel reaches capacity, tell people the event is too full.
 Since the profits have improved, we are all getting bonuses.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? the first sounds awkward. You can say the hotel is overcrowded, but not that the event is too full...
(1.)  What is another way to say “the hotel reaches capacity”? When all rooms are fully/totally/completely occupied.

I hope this helps.

Best,

Amy

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

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BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

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