English as a Second Language/sentences

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Question
1. The lower prices are more in line with the expectations of cost-conscious customers.
Rita is happy at her job because her company offers her a salary in line with her qualifications and experience.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “cost-conscious customers”?
(2.)    In each of the sentences, what can be taken in place of “in line with”?


2. We are greatly indebted to Associate Professor Catherine Wellington for her invaluable assistance.
United computer’s operating system is making inroads in the business community, according to a report that tracks desktop and server operating systems in medium to large-sized businesses.

(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “we are greatly indebted to”? “We greatly thank”, “we greatly appreciate” or what else?
(2.)    In the first sentence, is it possible to replace “invaluable”with “valuable” or “significant’?

(3.)    In the second, what is another way to say “making inroads” and “tracks”?


3. As the Summer Olympics approach, some of the best hotels are fully booked.
Hotels in this city are infrequently fully booked except when international sports events such as the Olympics are talking place there.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?

(1.)    In the first sentence, what can be placed in front of “fully” in the sentence? “Already”, “unusually” or “infrequently”?

(2.)    If “already” can be used in the first sentence, then what is the difference if I use the present perfect tense “As the summer Olympics approach, some of the best hotels have already been fully booked”?


4. We will provide new or rebuilt replacement parts, but we will not provide or pay for the labor to install the parts.

(1.)    In the sentence, can I replace “replacement parts” with “replaced parts”? What is the difference between them?
(2.)    Can you give me an example of how to use “replaced parts” in a sentence?

5. The awards ceremony saw a gathering of more than 300 key players from industry to honor the achievements of these outstanding scientists.
Would you like to join me in raising funds for the flood victims?

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is a substitute for “saw” or another way to say “saw a gathering of …”?

6. The item you requested is currently out of stock and will be available by the end of next month.
During the warranty period, StyleMade will cover the repair, or if repair is not possible, will either replace your StyleMade 201 washing machine, or refund the purchase price, whichever you prefer.

Are both sentences grammatically correct?
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I replace “available” with “in stock again”or “restocked”?
(2.)    In the second, what is a substitute for “whichever” or what is a different way to rephrase “whichever you prefer”?

Answer
1. The lower prices are more in line with the expectations of cost-conscious customers.
Rita is happy at her job because her company offers her a salary in line with her qualifications and experience.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? I'd say "happy with her job" in the second
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “cost-conscious customers”? careful, or economical; I doubt any of these synonyms express the same idea as the original "cost conscious" though
(2.)    In each of the sentences, what can be taken in place of “in line with”? in agreement with

2. We are greatly indebted to Associate Professor Catherine Wellington for her invaluable assistance.
United computer’s operating system is making inroads in the business community, according to a report that tracks desktop and server operating systems in medium to large-sized businesses.

(1.)    In the first sentence, what is another way to say “we are greatly indebted to”? “We greatly thank”, “we greatly appreciate”; we're extremely grateful
(2.)    In the first sentence, is it possible to replace “invaluable”with “valuable” or “significant’? yes, but the meaning changes slightly. Priceless would be a better synonym here
(3.)    In the second, what is another way to say “making inroads” and “tracks”? succeed; I have no suggestions for "tracks"

3. As the Summer Olympics approach, some of the best hotels are fully booked.
Hotels in this city are infrequently fully booked except when international sports events such as the Olympics are talking place there.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes but "rarely" instead of "infrequently"

(1.)    In the first sentence, what can be placed in front of “fully” in the sentence? “Already”, “unusually” or “infrequently”? already, and the verb tense has to be changed to present perfect: "have already been fully booked"

(2.)    If “already” can be used in the first sentence, then what is the difference if I use the present perfect tense “As the summer Olympics approach, some of the best hotels have already been fully booked”? see above


4. We will provide new or rebuilt replacement parts, but we will not provide or pay for the labor to install the parts.

(1.)    In the sentence, can I replace “replacement parts” with “replaced parts”? What is the difference between them? no; I've never even heard about "replaced parts" being used in such a context - replaced parts means parts that have already been replaced (I guess) while replacement parts means spare parts.
(2.)    Can you give me an example of how to use “replaced parts” in a sentence? not sure what you have in mind here, so I can't help you unless you give me some more information.

5. The awards ceremony saw a gathering of more than 300 key players from industry to honor the achievements of these outstanding scientists.
Would you like to join me in raising funds for the flood victims?

Are both sentences grammatically correct? the first one sounds awkward. I'd rephrase it:
There were more than 300 key players (from industry?!?) at the awards ceremony rewarding the achievements of these outstanding scientists.
(1.)    In the first sentence, what is a substitute for “saw” or another way to say “saw a gathering of …”? see above

6. The item you requested is currently out of stock and will be available by the end of next month.
During the warranty period, StyleMade will cover the repair, or if repair is not possible, will either replace your StyleMade 201 washing machine, or refund the purchase price, whichever you prefer.

Are both sentences grammatically correct? yes
(1.)    In the first sentence, does it mean the same if I replace “available” with “in stock again”or “restocked”? yes
(2.)    In the second, what is a substitute for “whichever” or what is a different way to rephrase “whichever you prefer”? "whatever" might be used instead of "whichever"  

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