You are here:

English as a Second Language/When to use comma before which?

Advertisement


Question
Dear Amy,

I sent you this question before. It was erroneously erased. I am really confused on when to use comma before "which" in a sentence.

Let's have a look at the following sentences:-




1a) She tried to separate me from her, which is not possible.

1b) She tried to separate me from her which is not possible.


------------------------------------------------------------------


2a) The shoe is dirty which I bought from store.

2b) The shoe is dirty, which I bought from store.


------------------------------------------------------------------

3a) He ignored her, which hurt her
.
3b) He ignored her which hurt her.

------------------------------------------------------------------

4a) He committed a crime which can not be justified in any way.


4b) He committed a crime, which can not be justified in any way.

------------------------------------------------------------------

5a) The book which you took yesterday is lost.

5b) The book, which you took yesterday is lost.

5c) The book, which you took yesterday, is lost.

------------------------------------------------------------------

6a) He is practicing, which is a good thing.


6b) He is practicing which is a good thing.

------------------------------------------------------------------

7a) She disregarded my advice, which shocked me.


7b) She disregarded my advice which shocked me.

Amy, can you clarify this? Is "Which shocked me" a separate clause? Is comma necessary here?


------------------------------------------------------------------

Just one more question, is the article "a" really needed here in this sentence:-

1) People who walk more have better heart function than people who don't walk.


2) People who walk more have a better heart function than people who don't walk.


------------------------------------------------------------------

Thanks.

Answer
Third answer, third question ;)

People who walk more have better heart function than people who don't walk.

The sentence is about "heart function" in general, not "a" specific heart function, so there is no need to use the indefinite article "a" here.

Best,

Amy

English as a Second Language

All Answers


Answers by Expert:


Ask Experts

Volunteer


Amy Baker

Expertise

I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

Experience

I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

Education/Credentials
BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

©2016 About.com. All rights reserved.