English as a Second Language/word choice

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Question
1.
You should not have any trouble finding us. We are next to the station.

(1.)In the sentence, does it mean the same if I say , “You should find us with no problems.”? What does “should” indicate in the sentence?

You must not park in front of the fire escape.
They are charging $300 an hour. They must be wrong.

(2.)   Does “must” in the first sentence have the same meaning as the one in the second? What is another way to say "You must not park..'?



2. M : Do you know who joined our company at an early age?

W: Either James or Bill started working here after high school.

(1.)   In W's response, may I leave out “either”?

  Meeting Room C is the only room that can hold sixty people.

(2.)   Does “hold” imply “ability” or “possibility”?


3.    
Angela earns as much as me.

(1.)   Does it mean the same if I say “Angela’s salary is the same as mine” or “Angela’s salary is as much as mine”?

Have you ever gone abroad on business?

(2.)   What is another way to say the sentence? “Have you ever traveled abroad for work”?

4.   
Very little time is available to resolve this problem.

(1.)   What is another way to say the sentence? “There is almost no time to resolve this problem”?

There are not many people to do all this work.
There are not enough people to do all this work.

(2.) What is the difference between the two?


5. Julia was here last week, so she could have heard the news.
Julia was away last week, so she could not have heard the news.

(1.)    Do “could have heard” in the first sentence and “could not have heard” in the second have opposite meanings? What is the difference?

(2.)    In the second, what is the difference if I replace “could not have” to “can not have”?

Answer
1.
You should not have any trouble finding us. We are next to the station.

(1.)In the sentence, does it mean the same if I say , “You should find us with no problems.”? yes but it doesn't sound natural.
What does “should” indicate in the sentence? it's a modal verb http://www.englishpage.com/modals/should.html

You must not park in front of the fire escape.
They are charging $300 an hour. They must be wrong.

(2.)   Does “must” in the first sentence have the same meaning as the one in the second? What is another way to say "You must not park..'? Under no circumstances should you park..

Must not in the first sentence means "it's prohibited"
Must in the second sentence means certainty



2. M : Do you know who joined our company at an early age?

W: Either James or Bill started working here after high school.

(1.)   In W's response, may I leave out “either”? yes

 Meeting Room C is the only room that can hold sixty people.

(2.)   Does “hold” imply “ability” or “possibility”? neither. "can" on the other hand implies ability


3.   
Angela earns as much as me. This should read "Angela earns as much as I do."

(1.)   Does it mean the same if I say “Angela’s salary is the same as mine” or “Angela’s salary is as much as mine”? yes

Have you ever gone abroad on business?

(2.)   What is another way to say the sentence? “Have you ever traveled abroad for work”? yes

4.   
Very little time is available to resolve this problem.

(1.)   What is another way to say the sentence? “There is almost no time LEFT to resolve this problem”?


There are not many people to do all this work.
There are not enough people to do all this work.

(2.) What is the difference between the two?
The first implies that there are some people who might do all that work.
The second implies that there are more people needed to do all that work.


5. Julia was here last week, so she could have heard the news.
Julia was away last week, so she could not have heard the news.

(1.)    Do “could have heard” in the first sentence and “could not have heard” in the second have opposite meanings? yes
What is the difference?  They have opposite meanings... I'm not sure  understand your question here.

(2.)    In the second, what is the difference if I replace “could not have” to “can not have”? It would be incorrect. The verb tense in the first sentence "was" asks for a past tense verb in the second sentence, thus "could"  

English as a Second Language

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Amy Baker

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I can answer question about grammar, spelling, syntax, idioms, reading and/or writing that pertain to English as a Second Language. I am knowledgeable about both TOEFL and IELTS.

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I'm a certified ESL teacher with 12 years of experience teaching K-12 and adults.

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BSc MEd TESL post grad program for k-12 TESL post grad program for adult ed

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